Brenda C. Buffington

Image
Brenda Buffington
First Name
Brenda
Last Name
Buffington
Credentials
EdD, NBC-HWC, ACSM-EP
Professor of Clinical Nursing
College of Nursing
Executive Director, Health Athlete Program
Buckeye Wellness Program Manager
Office of the Chief Wellness Officer
Address
397 Newton Hall
Address (Line 2)
295 W. 10th Ave.
City
Columbus
State
OH
Zip Code
43210

Brenda C. Buffington holds a doctorate in education and is a national board-certified health and wellness coach and a certified exercise physiologist. She has been a health promotion and disease prevention professional for almost 40 years. Before joining The Ohio State University, Buffington was the assistant director of the Human Performance Laboratory at the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO. Now in her ninth year at The Ohio State University College of Nursing, she is an assistant clinical professor in the Bachelor of Science in Health and Wellness degree program, executive director of Health Athlete, lead faculty for the Health and Wellness Coaching graduate certificate and a Buckeye Wellness program manager under the Office of the Chief Wellness Officer. Buffington has two grown sons and is passionate about health and wellness education, research, health coaching and helping everyone to live more fully engaged lives to become their best selves.

News

May 08, 2024

New data finds stress, anxiety and depression spike for those feeling the weight of a “culture of achievement”

Is the status of “perfect parent” attainable?

Researchers leading a national dialogue about parental burnout from The Ohio State University College of Nursing and the university’s Office of the Chief Wellness Officer say “no,” and a new study finds that pressure to try to be “perfect” leads to unhealthy impacts on both parents and their children.

April 30, 2024

Groundbreaking study provides a promising solution for preventing a major complication of pregnancy

According to the World Health Organization, more than 15 million babies are born preterm every year. More than one million of those babies lose their lives. Methods to predict risk for and prevent preterm birth are few and far between.