July 24, 2019

It’s possible that a lock of hair could one day aid in the diagnosis of depression and in efforts to monitor the effects of treatment, said the author of a new study examining cortisol levels in the hair of teens.

July 19, 2019
Grants support transformative research in healthcare across the lifespan

The Ohio State University College of Nursing announced today that faculty researchers at the college received approximately $10.7 million in grant funding during fiscal year 2019. That compares to $6.9 million granted for fiscal year 2018.

This level of funding supports research in several critical areas of healthcare, including aging and dementia care, understanding and preventing preterm birth, health and wellness interventions for vulnerable populations, symptom science, and improving critical and chronic care outcomes across the lifespan.

“We are grateful for the support our research faculty continue to receive to advance nursing and health sciences,” said Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FAAN, FGSA, associate dean of research and innovation at the College of Nursing. “Our researchers pursue breakthroughs and provide leadership in priority areas that promote wellness, stunt the impact of chronic disease and improve health across the lifespan.”

The college revealed in February that last year, it ranked #13 overall and #6 among public institutions nationally in National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant funding specifically.

April 18, 2019

Through a newly awarded $65.9 million federal research grant to address the opioid epidemic, The Ohio State University will lead a consortium of academic, state and community partners that aims to reduce overdose deaths by 40% over three years.

March 22, 2019

On the tombstone of Fannie Lou Hamer, a leader in the Civil Rights Movement who died of complications from hypertension and breast cancer, it says “I am sick and tired of being sick and tired.” Although Mrs. Hamer’s famous quote was in the context of living under the tyranny of the South’s Jim Crow, her sentiments are salient for African American women today. Oddly enough, the twentieth century issues that Fannie Lou Hamer and other civil rights leaders fought and shed their blood for are ever present in the twenty-first century. Issues such as voting rights, job discrimination, and housing continue to impact the quality of life among African American women and in turn affect their health. Today, African American women find themselves in unwanted leadership positions, where they have almost double the rates of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension compared with White women, resulting in higher mortality rates for these women. The persistence of disparity requires reexamining this complex phenomenon. As researchers and scholars, we will need to reframe our questions. We will need to move beyond the pedestrian questions that emanate from a single lens. We will need to challenge ourselves to using multiple lenses simultaneously, with the understanding that African American women are more than negative health statistics. Moreover, we will need to keep in mind that African American women are not monolithic but diverse as pointed out by poet Mona Lake Jones, they are “…Jugglers of profession, managers of lives; Mothers of children, lovers and wives; Good hearted, reaching out to others; Giving back to the community and supporting their brothers; All these sisters struggled through the path they had come….”

February 14, 2019
College ranks #13 among all nursing colleges, #6 among public institutions

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Ohio State University College of Nursing has made a significant leap in National Institutes of Health (NIH) ranking, placing it among the top 15 nursing colleges in the country. NIH rankings released this week show the College of Nursing at #13 overall and #6 among public institutions, with approximately $4.3 million in NIH research funding.

The College of Nursing ranked #20 last year and #31 two years ago.

“The NIH’s continued and increasing investment in our research at the College of Nursing demonstrates the outstanding quality of our research leadership, faculty and the staff who support them,” said Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, chief wellness officer and dean of the College of Nursing. “We are dreaming, discovering and delivering a healthier world with our faculty’s innovative and cutting-edge research that is truly transforming care and improving lives in real-world settings. I am deeply inspired by their work.”

“Our researchers are incredibly dedicated and passionate in their pursuit of science to prevent or relieve suffering, improve illness recovery, and help people live healthier lives,” said Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, associate dean for research and innovation at the College of Nursing. “It is not only rewarding to receive this level of investment from the NIH, but it is also motivating for us to keep exploring what we are capable of delivering to improve health and well-being across the life-span.”

 

College of Nursing research newly funded by the NIH this year includes:
Interdisciplinary study of Alzheimer’s patients

A five-year grant from NIH and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) is funding the study, “Sex Differences in Pain Reports and Brain Activation in Older Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease.” The grant was awarded to Todd Monroe, PhD, RN-BC, FNAP, FGSA, FAAN, associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Monroe’s interdisciplinary team includes faculty from the College of Nursing, the Departments of Neurology and Geriatrics, and the Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging at Ohio State, as well as collaborators from Vanderbilt University. The study is examining gender and Alzheimer’s-related differences in verbal pain reporting patterns and how they are displayed in regional and network brain function, with an aim to lead to better pain management.

 

Improving the health and well-being of older adults

A five-year grant from NIH and NIA is funding the interdisciplinary study, “Impact of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Oral Therapy on Healing of Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers in Older Adults.” The grant was awarded to Jodi McDaniel, PhD, RN, who is an associate professor and the graduate studies committee chair at The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Co-investigators include Alai Tan, MD, PhD, of the College of Nursing, and College of Medicine faculty Guibin Li, MD, PhD, Narasimham Parinandi, PhD, and Sashwati Roy, PhD. This project is testing a new oral nutrient therapy, and the project’s findings are expected to advance wound healing science.

 

Caring for infants with Down Syndrome and congenital heart disease

Tondi Harrison, PhD, RN, FAAN received an award to fund an administrative supplement to the study, “Behavioral and physiological responses to oral feeding in infants with complex congenital heart disease.” The supplement, from NIH’s INCLUDE program (INvestigation of Co-occurring conditions across the Lifespan to Understand Down SyndromE), will support the addition of infants who have both Down syndrome and congenital heart disease to the study. Harrison is an associate professor in the College of Nursing.

 

Helping pregnant women at-risk for complications

A three-year career development grant was awarded to Shannon Gillespie, PhD, RN, assistant professor, Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children and Youth. Her study, “Maternal Immune Responsiveness as Clinical Target for Preterm Birth Prevention” (The MIRACL Study) is testing a novel method of identifying women at risk for inflammatory preterm birth and determining whether specific preventive interventions are likely to offer benefit during the pregnancy.

 

Examining the role of fathers in birth outcomes

A grant entitled “Paternal Role in Adverse Birth Outcomes in Black Families” is a multi-university project awarded to: Carmen Giurgescu, PhD, RN, WHNP, associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing; Cleopatra Caldwell, PhD, of University of Michigan; and Dawn Phillips Misra, PhD, at Wayne State University. The study aims to add another dimension to efforts to reduce racial disparities in successful birth outcomes.

 

The College of Nursing is currently hiring new faculty who are committed to transforming health and transforming lives. You can find job openings in the college here.

December 05, 2018

A parent’s exposure to dirty air before conception might spell heart trouble for the next generation, a new animal study suggests.

November 19, 2018

The Ohio State University College of Nursing’s Center of Excellence in Critical and Complex Care has been renamed the Center for Healthy Aging, Self-Management and Complex Care to more accurately reflect the research conducted at the center, which aims to generate evidence that will improve health and care delivery to adults and older adults across settings.

With a mission consistent with that of the College of Nursing, the goal of the center’s work is to improve clinical care and health outcomes through exemplary transdisciplinary research in the areas of aging, self-management, critical and complex care especially within vulnerable populations.

The new center name was sparked by an expanded focus that encompasses research in healthy aging and health promotion. “The change to the center’s name reflects our goals to conduct research that will result in healthier lives, enhance quality of life for those with multiple comorbid conditions and dementia, and prepare the next generation of scholars and scientists who will advance gerontology, self-management science and critical care,” said Dr. Lorraine Mion, PhD, RN, FAAN, director of the Center for Healthy Aging, Self-Management and Complex Care.

Research in the Center for Healthy Aging, Self-Management and Complex Care highlights the processes, progression and outcomes of disease recovery in a variety of settings and populations. Center faculty develop and test interventions at the individual-, practitioner-, and organizational levels for disease prevention, health promotion and disease management.

Studies implemented at the center will target Hispanics, Asian Americans, refugees and immigrants, African Americans and Appalachian individuals through diabetes prevention programs, hypertension treatment, stress reduction and self-care strategies.

The center is committed to supporting health and wellness for older adults by advancing the science of prevention, care and recovery from critical and complex conditions; addressing pain and common geriatric syndromes; and addressing effectiveness and risk of treatment and care management strategies especially for those with dementia or other cognitive impairment.

October 19, 2018

This fall, The Ohio State University College of Nursing received a total of over $9 million in new grant funding for research from a variety of prestigious institutions, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the American Cancer Society, the Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation, the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, and others.

“Three of these awards are particularly significant as the proposed studies are part of exciting and important interdisciplinary work led by College of Nursing faculty who are early stage investigators, which means that they are receiving their first R01 or equivalent research grant. The future looks bright for nursing and transdisciplinary science in our college,” stated Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, associate dean for research and innovation in The Ohio State University College of Nursing.

NIH funds College of Nursing research

The National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research (NIH/NINR) awarded a $191 K grant to Tondi Harrison, PhD, RN,FAAN, (PI) to fund an administrative supplement to the study, “Behavioral and physiological responses to oral feeding in infants with complex congenital heart disease.” The supplement, from NIH’s INCLUDE program (INvestigation of Co-occurring conditions across the Lifespan to Understand Down SyndromE), will support the addition of infants who have both Down syndrome and congenital heart disease to the study. Harrison is an associate professor in the College of Nursing.

The NIH/NINR also awarded a $423 K, three-year career development grant to Shannon Gillespie, PhD, RN, assistant professor, Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children & Youth. Her study, “Maternal Immune Responsiveness as Clinical Target for Preterm Birth Prevention” (The MIRACL Study) will test a novel method of identifying women at risk for inflammatory preterm birth and determining whether specific preventive interventions are likely to offer benefit during the pregnancy.

Recent grants from the NIH also include a $3.3 million NIH/NIA R01 to Todd Monroe, PhD, RN-BC, FNAP, FGSA, FAAN, (PI); a $2.8 million NIH/NIA R01 to Jodi McDaniel, PhD, RN, (PI) and colleagues, and a $1.8 million NIH/NINR R01 to Carmen Giurgescu, PhD, RN, WHNP, and colleagues at Wayne State University.

“All of our new NIH funding provides evidence of the fantastic cutting-edge research being conducted by our nationally renowned faculty and the terrific research infrastructure that is provided by our college so that our faculty can achieve their dreams and produce major positive impact through their work,” stated Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer and dean and professor in the College of Nursing.

Other prestigious institutions support College of Nursing research

The American Cancer Society awarded a five-year, $1.7 million grant to Jennifer Kue, PhD, for the Intergenerational Refugee and Immigrant Cancer Screening Project.

The National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners awarded a foundation grant to Assistant Professor Lisa Kinsella Militello, PhD, MPH, RN, CPNP, to fund the study, “A Solution-Focused Approach: What Low-Income Parents with Young Children Need from Stress-Regulation Smartphone Apps.” IT Project Scientist Emre Sezgin, PhD, of Nationwide Children’s Hospital is a co-investigator on the project.

The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation awarded a grant to Pam Lusk, DNP, RN, FAANP, clinical associate professor, for the study, “Integrating Adolescent Substance Abuse Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) throughout Social Work and Nursing Education.”

The Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation awarded grants to  Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, (PI) and colleagues and  Laureen Smith, PhD, RN, FAAN, (PI) and colleagues.

June 29, 2018

The Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) presented the Kimberly-Clark Huggies Nursing Research Award to Marliese Nist, RNC-NIC, MS, for her work entitled, “Inflammatory Mediators of Stress Exposure and Neurodevelopment in Very Preterm Infants.” The award is supported through an educational grant from the Kimberly-Clark Corporation and was presented at the 2018 AWHONN National Convention in Tampa, Florida. Nist is a PhD candidate at The Ohio State University College of Nursing.

Nist has also recently been awarded a 2018 grant from the National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN) and was one of six nurses selected nationally to receive a Heilbrunn Nurse Scholar Award. The Heilbrunn Nurse Scholar Award is given by The Rockefeller University’s Heilbrunn Family Center for Research Nursing to support nurses while they pursue independent research projects that will make a significant contribution to the discipline of nursing. The award provides a maximum of $25,000 for one or two years. Funding for the awards, now in their fifth year, is from an endowment established by sisters Helaine Lerner and Joan Rechnitz in honor of their parents, Harriet and Robert Heilbrunn.

In her doctoral research at Ohio State, Nist has been analyzing the relationships between stress exposure during the NICU hospitalization period, inflammation and neurodevelopment. Nist saw a need for study of the 28-31 week old population of preterm infants, which is responsible for a large percentage of population neurodevelopment impairments, but has not been subject to as much study as early preterm infants.

January 20, 2018
  1. FloAnn Easton Professor of Pediatric and Adolescent Health
  2. Grayce Sills Professorship in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing
  3. Director, Center for Women, Children and Youth


Institution

The Ohio State University College of Nursing has embarked on a new era of excellence, led by Associate Vice President for Health Promotion, University Chief Wellness Officer, and Dean of the College of Nursing Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN. Under her leadership, the college is engaged in bold new strategic initiatives to lead cutting-edge transdisciplinary research that impacts outcomes in real-world settings. The college is located on the largest health sciences campus in the country and is one of seven health science colleges at Ohio State with outstanding collaborations with the world renowned Ohio State Wexner Medical Center and the Ohio State James Comprehensive Cancer Center. The college has three nationally renowned centers of excellence, including the Center for Women, Children and Youth, the Center of Excellence in Critical and Complex Care and the Center for Transdisciplinary Evidence-based Practice. It offers robust PhD and DNP programs as well as several other outstanding graduate and baccalaureate degrees. Faculty and students in the college are engaged in a wide variety of cutting-edge research in basic, biological and clinical research to improve health outcomes across the lifespan. Bold new research initiatives have been launched, including a recently funded National Institutes of Health/National Institute for Nursing Research T32 in child health. These two endowed professors will conduct cutting-edge research that impacts outcomes and mentor junior faculty as well as pre- and post-doctoral fellows. The Director of the Center for Women, Children and Youth will lead an outstanding group of faculty to expand the science and impact of research to improve outcomes in those populations. These are all 12-month positions, and continued NIH-funding is an expectation.

 

Qualifications

  • Successful candidates will hold an earned PhD in nursing or related health discipline.
  • a curriculum vitae consistent with appointment at the full professor (preferred) or associate professor rank 
  • history of sustained NIH and other extra-mural funded research 
  • commitment to diversity, innovation and transdisciplinary research and scholarship
  • track record of leadership in mentoring students and faculty in research and scholarship 
  • track record of transdisciplinary collaboration
  • excellent communication and team-building skills

 

Responsibilities

  • conducts extramurally funded research, preferably from NIH
  • mentors faculty and doctoral students in research program development 
  • provides strategic leadership to the research centers within the college
  • leads and/or assists with the development of center and T32 grant applications 
  • implements strategic initiatives related to research and scholarship development

 

All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status or protected veteran status.

Inquiries, nominations, or applications (including a cover letter, curriculum vitae and names of three references) should be directed electronically and in confidence to:

Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/PMHNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN
Associate Vice President for Health Promotion
University Chief Wellness Officer
Dean and Professor, College of Nursing
Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry, College of Medicine
melnyk.15@osu.edu