April 08, 2021

ALISO VIEJO, Calif. – April 8, 2021 – The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) recently selected Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FAAN, FGSA, as its 2021 Distinguished Research Lecturer.

AACN established the award in 1982 to honor nurses who make significant contributions to acute and critical care research. The annual award recognizes research that changes or improves patient outcomes, and advances nursing education and practice.

With more than 22 years of external funding support, Happ has built a program of interdisciplinary, practice-based research focused on improving care and communication with communication-impaired patients, their families and clinicians during critical illness and at the end of life, particularly with patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

August 19, 2020

by Pat Ford-Roegner

In the 1960s, NASA launched the use of telehealth to monitor astronauts’ vital signs. Later, mental health counselors embraced the use of telehealth sessions.

Despite its strong historical track record, though, many policymakers have questioned telehealth’s widespread usefulness for years. They cite the public’s often-expressed reticence to share information via new technology and the need to devote limited funding resources to other diagnosis and treatment tools.

COVID-19 may now be bending the public perception curve toward telehealth. Patients with minor ailments or those wanting to know if their symptoms could be caused by the virus have been willing to forgo crowded waiting rooms, long waits for appointments with their primary care providers and fears of new devices to give virtual visits a try. The utilization rate has been impressive.

Teladoc Health – a U.S.-based multinational telemedicine and virtual healthcare company – reports running 2.8 million total virtual visits in the second quarter of 2020, tripling the number from 2019. A recent U.S. Department of Health and Human Services report of Medicare fee-for-service claims from January to June 2020 showed that the share of Medicare services accessed via telehealth jumped from 0.1 percent in February to almost 44 percent in April. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid may well permanently expand telehealth coverage. Congress is considering bills to extend coverage and to fund studies measuring telehealth’s impact on the future of patient-centered care.

Foundations are calling for research to study the impact of telehealth models on federally qualified health centers, rural health centers and home health care. Funding streams can shape the future of telehealth by addressing underserved communities, veteran care, homebound populations, racial health disparities and mental health services. As the pandemic and our society’s reaction to it evolves, care is needed to bridge the gap between the haves and have-nots in using technology to deliver health care.

Telenursing is a key component of telehealth. The first documented telenursing event occurred in 1974 when Mary Quinn, RN, provided remote nursing care to patients at Boston’s Logan Airport. In 1997 the American Nurses Association (ANA) published a definition along with professional guidelines.

Nurses engaged in telenursing practice continue to assess, plan, intervene and evaluate the outcomes of nursing care using technologies such as the Internet, personal computers, telephones, digital assessment tools and telemonitoring equipment.

New resources could provide clinical and educational leaders in nursing with new opportunities. The Ohio State University is well ahead of the game and could emerge as a nationwide leader with a seat at the telehealth policy tables inside and outside of government. The Mary Wiedle Hamilton Advanced Health Assessment Simulation Lab at Ohio State’s College of Nursing includes a telehealth services portal for student practice. The college’s curricula incorporates telehealth across the spectrum of care delivery experiences based on “evidence that virtual delivery of care is correlated with improved access to care, positive health outcomes, cost savings and patient satisfaction.”

How will the nation’s clinical community adapt to the new challenges and opportunities for telehealth? With a portal into patients’ lives, nurses and other healthcare practitioners can assimilate what they are learning to improve the quality of care and make patient-centered care a reality. Stay connected on this evolution with Ohio State and your professional organizations!

Pat Ford-Roegner, RN, MSW, FAAN has previously served as Region IV director at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, chief executive officer at the American Academy of Nursing and health policy expert for Amplify Public Affairs.


Telehealth facts for the College of Nursing’s Total Health and Wellness at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center East Hospital, our nurse practitioner-led comprehensive care facility and a Federally Qualified Health Center:

  • Before COVID-19/telehealth, the no-show rate averaged around 28% for established patients and 45% for new patients. In June and July of 2020, the no show rate for established patients has averaged 9.5% and the new patient appointment no-show rate in May was 18%. It is speculated that transportation was the biggest barrier for patients and the primary reason for missing appointments.
     
  • “Patients are appreciative that they do not have to come into the office and put their health at risk. They genuinely feel cared for and safe. I look forward to the time that I will be able to really see them and share a hug, but for now this is an excellent way to provide primary care,” said Candy Rinehart, DNP, APRN-CNP, ADM-BC, FAANP, CEO and director of Total Health and Wellness.
     
  • Total Health and Wellness did not provide telehealth before the pandemic because it was not reimbursable. However, with the present payment structure, especially with Medicare and Medicaid, they are being reimbursed at nearly the same fee for service as before. With the decreased no-show rate and fuller provider schedules, Total Health and Wellness is able to continue its services and maintain staff and providers.

Read about the emergence and future potential impact of telehealth in Health AffairsTelehealth Should Be Expanded—If It Can Address Today’s Health Care Challenges


 

August 05, 2020

The need for human touch is universal among critical care patients and is an important component of the nurse–patient relationship. However, multiple barriers to human touch exist in the critical care environment. With little research to guide practice, we argue for the importance of human touch in the provision of holistic nursing care.

May 20, 2020

When researchers asked prospective study participants who they would like to see in videos promoting healthy lifestyle behaviors, the answer was unequivocal: They wanted to see themselves – that is, other mothers living in low-income households who were overweight or obese.

The researchers obliged. And the intervention they designed produced the desired results when it came to improving participants’ diet. As a group, the women in the study who watched the videos and talked to their peers over 16 weeks were more likely to have reduced their fat consumption than women in a comparison group who were given print materials about lifestyle change.

The participants were women who face stubborn health challenges – highly stressed overweight low-income mothers of young children who, for example, tend to retain 10 or more pounds of pregnancy weight after childbirth and are likely to eat high-fat foods. They are at risk for life-long obesity and potential problems for themselves and new babies if they become pregnant again.

“I asked them during focus groups who should be in the videos, and they said, ‘We want to see us. And our children. Do not lie to us and hire professionals, because we’ll be able to tell,’” said Mei-Wei Chang, lead author of the study and associate professor of nursing at The Ohio State University.

“They said, ‘We want to see them before the change and the struggles they had, and what happened after that.’”

Chang and colleagues identified two factors that led to the intervention’s success: The study was designed to appeal to the participants’ personal values and instill in these mothers enough confidence to take on the challenge of living a healthier life.

“My experience with this population is that they really want to make a change. Some might perceive that they don’t want to. But they do – they just don’t know how to,” Chang said.

The research is published online in the journal Appetite and will appear in the August print issue.

The two psychosocial factors Chang and colleagues examined in this study are known as autonomous motivation (what’s important in a person’s life) and self-efficacy (a person’s confidence in her ability to carry out a behavior or task). Previous research has shown that poverty can lead to low self-efficacy.

Autonomous motivation differs by population. In this study, the participants told researchers in focus groups before the intervention began that they wanted to be role models for their children. They hoped to be less stressed and happier, and to maintain good family relationships.

Chang recruited participants from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), which serves low-income pregnant, postpartum and breastfeeding women and children up to age 5. Those eligible for the program must have an annual household income no higher than 185 percent of the federal poverty line.

The mothers were between the ages of 18 and 39 and their body mass index ranged from 25.0 to 39.9 – from the lowest indicator of being overweight to just below the extreme obesity range. The intervention was aimed at preventing weight gain by promoting stress management, healthy eating and physical activity. This study analyzed only the diet-related results.

During the trial, the 212 participants randomized into the intervention group watched a total of 10 videos in which women like them gave testimonials about healthy eating and food preparation, managing their stress and being physically active.

In the videos, the women wore casual clothes and told their stories, unscripted. They demonstrated meal prep with familiar foods and showed that simple, practical steps – like reading food labels – could gradually lead to a healthier lifestyle.

“They talked about a lot of things I didn’t know,” said Chang, who has worked with women enrolled in WIC for about 20 years. “They spoke their mind about what was important – like how they mentally dealt with changing behavior but not losing weight. And about being afraid to fail.”

The participants also dialed in to 10 peer support group teleconferences over the course of the study.

In phone interviews, the researchers asked the mothers about what they were eating, their confidence in sticking to a low-fat diet and why they wanted to eat more healthfully.

Based on those surveys, the researchers determined that, compared to the group reading print materials, the mothers who watched videos and spoke with their peers reported larger increases in autonomous motivation and self-efficacy and a more significant decrease in fat intake after the 16-week intervention.

“Essentially, they said, ‘If she could do it, I could do it.’ That’s why we used peers to develop the intervention,” Chang said.

The researchers are still analyzing data related to physical activity results, and have found that the intervention’s emphasis on coping self-efficacy helped reduce participants’ stress. The videos are now part of WIC’s continuing education series for mothers.

This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health.

Co-authors included Alai Tan and Duane Wegener from Ohio State and Jiying Ling and Lorraine Robbins from Michigan State University.

April 23, 2020

Health and well-being hub represents an innovative first step towards addressing burnout and associated mental health issues among nurses nationwide

Trusted Health, the career platform for the modern nurse, and The Ohio State University College of Nursing today announced a new initiative to promote mental health and well-being among nurses on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. The program will be piloted with nurses in New York and Michigan -- two of the states hit hardest by the pandemic -- and rolled out nationwide in the coming weeks. 

Even before the current crisis hit, burnout among nurses has been at an all-time high, with some studies estimating that up to 63 percent of nurses exhibit symptoms such as job-induced stress, anxiety and depression. In addition, nurses are at increased risk of suicide. More than half report being in suboptimal mental or physical health, which research shows can lead to more errors in caring for patients. The COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated this issue, as frontline nurses find themselves delivering care for a high volume of acutely ill patients, often in situations with limited crisis response training or supplies of personal protective equipment (PPE). 

Trusted and The Ohio State University have come together to help address this issue through a partnership that will provide access to wellness support and evidence-based strategies from nursing faculty and advanced practice nursing (APN) students from The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Nurses employed by Trusted who are working in facilities with COVID-19 patients will be able to access an emotional support line staffed by seasoned nurse practitioner faculty, including mental health experts, and supervised students. Those faculty and students will review stressors with callers and offer coping strategies and stress-reduction techniques.

Nurses who call the emotional support line may then opt to participate in a wellness support partnership program supported by the College of Nursing for a period of four or eight weeks. This will include cognitive-behavioral skills building, motivational interviewing, mindfulness and therapeutic communication aimed at finding sustainable solutions to enhance the nurses’ health and well-being, both during the pandemic and for life.

“Our healthcare professionals on the front lines of this pandemic deserve not only our highest regards for their selfless service, but also our support to handle what they are feeling and experiencing because of this crisis,” said Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, APRN-CNP, EBP-C, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer and dean of the College of Nursing at Ohio State. “Our college’s faculty, staff and students participating in this effort are well-versed in evidence-based interventions that will not only help these nurses survive, but thrive and build the resilience needed to continue to provide high-quality care and save lives.”

“As a nurses-first company, Trusted was founded on a simple idea: Nurses are the backbone of our healthcare system, and we must do more to support them,” said Dan Weberg, PhD, RN, head of clinical innovation at Trusted. “The COVID-19 crisis has pushed this issue into the national consciousness, and we are committed to using this moment to advocate for and identify new ways to support the mental well-being of nurses not just on the front lines, but everywhere.” 

Since the onset of COVID-19, Trusted has been focused on meeting the unprecedented demand for healthcare workers by matching nurses who have raised their hands to help with hospitals battling the pandemic. As a nurses-first company, Trusted was among the first to offer guaranteed quarantine pay for all of their nurses, and has made their Nurse Advocate team -- former bedside nurses who offer guidance throughout the job search process -- available 24/7 to support the needs of Trusted nurses working on the front lines. Over the last several weeks, nearly 40,000 nurses have signed up via Trusted to work on the front lines of the crisis. 

About Trusted Health

Trusted is where modern nurses go to build their careers. Nurses are the backbone of our healthcare system and yet their options for finding new roles are cumbersome and outdated. Trusted is on a mission to change this by matching the nurses on our platform with a range of flexible jobs that meet their preferences and career goals. With support from a dedicated Nurse Advocate and unmatched insight into compensation and contract details, Trusted makes it easy for nurses to navigate the job search process and manage their careers with confidence. 

Trusted supports hiring in all 50 states and has connected the nurses on its platform with thousands of opportunities. Based in San Francisco, CA, Trusted has raised $25 million in funding from Craft Ventures, Felicis Ventures, and Founder Collective, as well as healthcare innovators like Texas Medical Center and Healthbox. For more information, visit trustedhealth.com.

About The Ohio State University College of Nursing

The Ohio State University College of Nursing exists to transform health and improve lives through top-tier teaching, research and innovation, grounded in evidence-based practice and a powerful culture and support system to foster optimal personal well-being.

The college’s nationally-ranked academic programs taught by world-class faculty offer top-notch programs for future and current nurses and healthcare leaders. U.S. News & World Report highly ranks our university-wide online bachelor’s including RN to BSN (#1), online master’s (#4), traditional master’s (#6) and online Doctor of Nursing Practice (#8). Majors include both nursing and programs in healthcare and wellness innovation, along with certificates that range from school nurse and primary care to nurse education and nurse/health coaching.

The college’s two research centers – the Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children and Youth and the Center for Healthy Aging, Self-Management and Complex Care – seek innovative solutions to real-world healthcare issues. The college received approximately $10.7 million in research awards in FY2019, including $4.3 million in NIH funding – #6 among public institutions and #13 overall. Its Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-based Practice (EBP) in Nursing and Healthcare promotes EBP worldwide and offers the first globally-recognized certificate of added qualification in EBP.

April 17, 2020

Drs. Mary Beth Happ and Judy Tate discuss evidence-based tips and techniques for communicating with mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19. Mary Beth and Judy are members of the Patient Provider Communication Forum COVID-19 Task Force, a multidisciplinary group of nurses and speech language pathologists with expertise in communication science.

March 25, 2020

A recent TEDxColumbus talk on innovation and nursing was given by Tim Raderstorf, DNP, RN. Tim is a nurse, teacher, and Chief Innovation Officer at Ohio State University, and co-author of the book Evidence-based Leadership, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship in Nursing and Healthcare.

October 22, 2019
Program explores keto eating, other interventions and impact on cardiovascular risk for African American women

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation has awarded a one-year, $50,000 Hillman Emergent Innovation Program grant to two research faculty from The Ohio State University College of Nursing for their program, “Keto Prescribed: Translating Ketogenic Research into Clinical Practice.” Sigma Theta Tau International has also awarded the project a $20,000 American Nurses Credentialing Center Evidence-Based Practice Implementation Grant to fund the initial round of participants.

The project’s proposal states that “this nurse practitioner-led health coaching program incorporates ketogenic eating and culturally competent mental/physical health interventions to reduce cardiovascular disease risk and increase quality of life for adult African American women.” Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for women (one out of every three women). Research shows not only a growing prevalence of obesity and diet-related diseases such as diabetes in African American women, but also that there are opportunities for changes in lifestyle behaviors to help improve well-being for African American women, who are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

“We are grateful for the Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation’s and Sigma Theta Tau International's support of a program that we believe will be life-changing for this population of women,” said Barbara Jones Warren, PhD, RN, APRN-CNS, FNAP, FAAN, professor of clinical nursing at the College of Nursing and the principal investigator for this project. “We are taking a holistic approach of combining nutrition under keto principles with other appropriate interventions to transform the health of these women and impact their lives in meaningful ways.”

According to the project proposal, “Keto Prescribed” will create a nurse practitioner-led, interdisciplinary team-based model of care in a community setting. The activities planned through the program include community and online group interactions; physical checks to measure outcomes of areas such as weight, body mass index and blood pressure; and evaluations using surveys to measure progress in participants’ quality of life and the feasibility and acceptability of the dietary intervention.

“I’m so inspired by the potential of this program,” said Audra Hanners, MSN, RN, APRN-CNP. Hanners, an instructor of clinical practice at the College of Nursing, is assisting with this program. “We are working to clear barriers to better health for African American women, and the commitment from the Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation and Sigma Theta Tau International is crucial to this mission.”

According to its website, the Hillman Emergent Innovation Program supports forward-thinking nurses who create “bold, early-stage (pre-evidence or untested) interventions that target health and health care needs for vulnerable populations, including groups that are economically disadvantaged, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBTQ people, the homeless, rural populations and others.”

The mission of Sigma Theta Tau International, which was founded in 1922 at what is now the Indiana University School of Nursing, is "advancing world health and celebrating nursing excellence in scholarship, leadership and service."

People interested in participating in the program can find more information here.

May 21, 2019

Telehealth – the use of communication technologies to provide healthcare services remotely – offers both patient convenience and a promising solution to the crisis of limited healthcare access in Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs) across the United States. Its use is spreading widely and, at The Ohio State University College of Nursing, we teach telehealth techniques across our curriculum, both on campus and online.

March 29, 2019

Cindy Anderson, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAHA, FNAP, FAAN, The Ohio State University College of Nursing associate professor and associate dean of academic affairs and educational innovation, was installed as the new president of the Midwest Nursing Research Society (MNRS) at the 2019 MNRS 43rd Annual Research Conference, March 29 in Kansas City, Missouri. Anderson previously served a one-year term as president-elect.

“I am honored to serve as the president of MNRS.  As a new researcher, MNRS was integral to the launch of my research career, providing the opportunity network with esteemed scientist colleagues throughout the Midwest. The benefits of active engagement in MNRS have continued through the years, providing the opportunity to work together with our members to advance nursing science. I am grateful to have an opportunity to give back to MNRS as president and look forward to supporting the members and the mission.”

The mission of MNRS is to advance science, transform practice and enhance careers through a network of scholars. In her role as president of MNRS, Anderson will direct the association based on the overall mission of MNRS, update and approve strategic plans and develop and approve policies and procedures along with the rest of the Board of Directors.

MNRS focuses on developing scholars, driving science and leading innovation to improve the health of all people. The overarching goal of MNRS is to grow and retain membership, enhance products and services, allocate resources efficiently and enhance MNRS leadership opportunities and development.

Founded in 1975, MNRS provides a place for nurses to collaborate, come together to share ideas and grow the nursing field through innovative research.