May 20, 2020

When researchers asked prospective study participants who they would like to see in videos promoting healthy lifestyle behaviors, the answer was unequivocal: They wanted to see themselves – that is, other mothers living in low-income households who were overweight or obese.

The researchers obliged. And the intervention they designed produced the desired results when it came to improving participants’ diet. As a group, the women in the study who watched the videos and talked to their peers over 16 weeks were more likely to have reduced their fat consumption than women in a comparison group who were given print materials about lifestyle change.

The participants were women who face stubborn health challenges – highly stressed overweight low-income mothers of young children who, for example, tend to retain 10 or more pounds of pregnancy weight after childbirth and are likely to eat high-fat foods. They are at risk for life-long obesity and potential problems for themselves and new babies if they become pregnant again.

“I asked them during focus groups who should be in the videos, and they said, ‘We want to see us. And our children. Do not lie to us and hire professionals, because we’ll be able to tell,’” said Mei-Wei Chang, lead author of the study and associate professor of nursing at The Ohio State University.

“They said, ‘We want to see them before the change and the struggles they had, and what happened after that.’”

Chang and colleagues identified two factors that led to the intervention’s success: The study was designed to appeal to the participants’ personal values and instill in these mothers enough confidence to take on the challenge of living a healthier life.

“My experience with this population is that they really want to make a change. Some might perceive that they don’t want to. But they do – they just don’t know how to,” Chang said.

The research is published online in the journal Appetite and will appear in the August print issue.

The two psychosocial factors Chang and colleagues examined in this study are known as autonomous motivation (what’s important in a person’s life) and self-efficacy (a person’s confidence in her ability to carry out a behavior or task). Previous research has shown that poverty can lead to low self-efficacy.

Autonomous motivation differs by population. In this study, the participants told researchers in focus groups before the intervention began that they wanted to be role models for their children. They hoped to be less stressed and happier, and to maintain good family relationships.

Chang recruited participants from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), which serves low-income pregnant, postpartum and breastfeeding women and children up to age 5. Those eligible for the program must have an annual household income no higher than 185 percent of the federal poverty line.

The mothers were between the ages of 18 and 39 and their body mass index ranged from 25.0 to 39.9 – from the lowest indicator of being overweight to just below the extreme obesity range. The intervention was aimed at preventing weight gain by promoting stress management, healthy eating and physical activity. This study analyzed only the diet-related results.

During the trial, the 212 participants randomized into the intervention group watched a total of 10 videos in which women like them gave testimonials about healthy eating and food preparation, managing their stress and being physically active.

In the videos, the women wore casual clothes and told their stories, unscripted. They demonstrated meal prep with familiar foods and showed that simple, practical steps – like reading food labels – could gradually lead to a healthier lifestyle.

“They talked about a lot of things I didn’t know,” said Chang, who has worked with women enrolled in WIC for about 20 years. “They spoke their mind about what was important – like how they mentally dealt with changing behavior but not losing weight. And about being afraid to fail.”

The participants also dialed in to 10 peer support group teleconferences over the course of the study.

In phone interviews, the researchers asked the mothers about what they were eating, their confidence in sticking to a low-fat diet and why they wanted to eat more healthfully.

Based on those surveys, the researchers determined that, compared to the group reading print materials, the mothers who watched videos and spoke with their peers reported larger increases in autonomous motivation and self-efficacy and a more significant decrease in fat intake after the 16-week intervention.

“Essentially, they said, ‘If she could do it, I could do it.’ That’s why we used peers to develop the intervention,” Chang said.

The researchers are still analyzing data related to physical activity results, and have found that the intervention’s emphasis on coping self-efficacy helped reduce participants’ stress. The videos are now part of WIC’s continuing education series for mothers.

This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health.

Co-authors included Alai Tan and Duane Wegener from Ohio State and Jiying Ling and Lorraine Robbins from Michigan State University.

April 23, 2020

Health and well-being hub represents an innovative first step towards addressing burnout and associated mental health issues among nurses nationwide

Trusted Health, the career platform for the modern nurse, and The Ohio State University College of Nursing today announced a new initiative to promote mental health and well-being among nurses on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. The program will be piloted with nurses in New York and Michigan -- two of the states hit hardest by the pandemic -- and rolled out nationwide in the coming weeks. 

Even before the current crisis hit, burnout among nurses has been at an all-time high, with some studies estimating that up to 63 percent of nurses exhibit symptoms such as job-induced stress, anxiety and depression. In addition, nurses are at increased risk of suicide. More than half report being in suboptimal mental or physical health, which research shows can lead to more errors in caring for patients. The COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated this issue, as frontline nurses find themselves delivering care for a high volume of acutely ill patients, often in situations with limited crisis response training or supplies of personal protective equipment (PPE). 

Trusted and The Ohio State University have come together to help address this issue through a partnership that will provide access to wellness support and evidence-based strategies from nursing faculty and advanced practice nursing (APN) students from The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Nurses employed by Trusted who are working in facilities with COVID-19 patients will be able to access an emotional support line staffed by seasoned nurse practitioner faculty, including mental health experts, and supervised students. Those faculty and students will review stressors with callers and offer coping strategies and stress-reduction techniques.

Nurses who call the emotional support line may then opt to participate in a wellness support partnership program supported by the College of Nursing for a period of four or eight weeks. This will include cognitive-behavioral skills building, motivational interviewing, mindfulness and therapeutic communication aimed at finding sustainable solutions to enhance the nurses’ health and well-being, both during the pandemic and for life.

“Our healthcare professionals on the front lines of this pandemic deserve not only our highest regards for their selfless service, but also our support to handle what they are feeling and experiencing because of this crisis,” said Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, APRN-CNP, EBP-C, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer and dean of the College of Nursing at Ohio State. “Our college’s faculty, staff and students participating in this effort are well-versed in evidence-based interventions that will not only help these nurses survive, but thrive and build the resilience needed to continue to provide high-quality care and save lives.”

“As a nurses-first company, Trusted was founded on a simple idea: Nurses are the backbone of our healthcare system, and we must do more to support them,” said Dan Weberg, PhD, RN, head of clinical innovation at Trusted. “The COVID-19 crisis has pushed this issue into the national consciousness, and we are committed to using this moment to advocate for and identify new ways to support the mental well-being of nurses not just on the front lines, but everywhere.” 

Since the onset of COVID-19, Trusted has been focused on meeting the unprecedented demand for healthcare workers by matching nurses who have raised their hands to help with hospitals battling the pandemic. As a nurses-first company, Trusted was among the first to offer guaranteed quarantine pay for all of their nurses, and has made their Nurse Advocate team -- former bedside nurses who offer guidance throughout the job search process -- available 24/7 to support the needs of Trusted nurses working on the front lines. Over the last several weeks, nearly 40,000 nurses have signed up via Trusted to work on the front lines of the crisis. 

About Trusted Health

Trusted is where modern nurses go to build their careers. Nurses are the backbone of our healthcare system and yet their options for finding new roles are cumbersome and outdated. Trusted is on a mission to change this by matching the nurses on our platform with a range of flexible jobs that meet their preferences and career goals. With support from a dedicated Nurse Advocate and unmatched insight into compensation and contract details, Trusted makes it easy for nurses to navigate the job search process and manage their careers with confidence. 

Trusted supports hiring in all 50 states and has connected the nurses on its platform with thousands of opportunities. Based in San Francisco, CA, Trusted has raised $25 million in funding from Craft Ventures, Felicis Ventures, and Founder Collective, as well as healthcare innovators like Texas Medical Center and Healthbox. For more information, visit www.trustedhealth.com

About The Ohio State University College of Nursing

The Ohio State University College of Nursing exists to transform health and improve lives through top-tier teaching, research and innovation, grounded in evidence-based practice and a powerful culture and support system to foster optimal personal well-being.

The college’s nationally-ranked academic programs taught by world-class faculty offer top-notch programs for future and current nurses and healthcare leaders. U.S. News & World Report highly ranks our university-wide online bachelor’s including RN to BSN (#1), online master’s (#4), traditional master’s (#6) and online Doctor of Nursing Practice (#8). Majors include both nursing and programs in healthcare and wellness innovation, along with certificates that range from school nurse and primary care to nurse education and nurse/health coaching.

The college’s two research centers – the Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children and Youth and the Center for Healthy Aging, Self-Management and Complex Care – seek innovative solutions to real-world healthcare issues. The college received approximately $10.7 million in research awards in FY2019, including $4.3 million in NIH funding – #6 among public institutions and #13 overall. Its Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-based Practice (EBP) in Nursing and Healthcare promotes EBP worldwide and offers the first globally-recognized certificate of added qualification in EBP.

April 17, 2020

Drs. Mary Beth Happ and Judy Tate discuss evidence-based tips and techniques for communicating with mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19. Mary Beth and Judy are members of the Patient Provider Communication Forum COVID-19 Task Force, a multidisciplinary group of nurses and speech language pathologists with expertise in communication science.

March 25, 2020

A recent TEDxColumbus talk on innovation and nursing was given by Tim Raderstorf, DNP, RN. Tim is a nurse, teacher, and Chief Innovation Officer at Ohio State University, and co-author of the book Evidence-based Leadership, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship in Nursing and Healthcare.

October 22, 2019
Program explores keto eating, other interventions and impact on cardiovascular risk for African American women

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation has awarded a one-year, $50,000 Hillman Emergent Innovation Program grant to two research faculty from The Ohio State University College of Nursing for their program, “Keto Prescribed: Translating Ketogenic Research into Clinical Practice.” Sigma Theta Tau International has also awarded the project a $20,000 American Nurses Credentialing Center Evidence-Based Practice Implementation Grant to fund the initial round of participants.

The project’s proposal states that “this nurse practitioner-led health coaching program incorporates ketogenic eating and culturally competent mental/physical health interventions to reduce cardiovascular disease risk and increase quality of life for adult African American women.” Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for women (one out of every three women). Research shows not only a growing prevalence of obesity and diet-related diseases such as diabetes in African American women, but also that there are opportunities for changes in lifestyle behaviors to help improve well-being for African American women, who are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

“We are grateful for the Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation’s and Sigma Theta Tau International's support of a program that we believe will be life-changing for this population of women,” said Barbara Jones Warren, PhD, RN, APRN-CNS, FNAP, FAAN, professor of clinical nursing at the College of Nursing and the principal investigator for this project. “We are taking a holistic approach of combining nutrition under keto principles with other appropriate interventions to transform the health of these women and impact their lives in meaningful ways.”

According to the project proposal, “Keto Prescribed” will create a nurse practitioner-led, interdisciplinary team-based model of care in a community setting. The activities planned through the program include community and online group interactions; physical checks to measure outcomes of areas such as weight, body mass index and blood pressure; and evaluations using surveys to measure progress in participants’ quality of life and the feasibility and acceptability of the dietary intervention.

“I’m so inspired by the potential of this program,” said Audra Hanners, MSN, RN, APRN-CNP. Hanners, an instructor of clinical practice at the College of Nursing, is assisting with this program. “We are working to clear barriers to better health for African American women, and the commitment from the Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation and Sigma Theta Tau International is crucial to this mission.”

According to its website, the Hillman Emergent Innovation Program supports forward-thinking nurses who create “bold, early-stage (pre-evidence or untested) interventions that target health and health care needs for vulnerable populations, including groups that are economically disadvantaged, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBTQ people, the homeless, rural populations and others.”

The mission of Sigma Theta Tau International, which was founded in 1922 at what is now the Indiana University School of Nursing, is "advancing world health and celebrating nursing excellence in scholarship, leadership and service."

People interested in participating in the program can find more information here.

May 21, 2019

Telehealth – the use of communication technologies to provide healthcare services remotely – offers both patient convenience and a promising solution to the crisis of limited healthcare access in Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs) across the United States. Its use is spreading widely and, at The Ohio State University College of Nursing, we teach telehealth techniques across our curriculum, both on campus and online.

March 29, 2019

Cindy Anderson, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAHA, FNAP, FAAN, The Ohio State University College of Nursing associate professor and associate dean of academic affairs and educational innovation, was installed as the new president of the Midwest Nursing Research Society (MNRS) at the 2019 MNRS 43rd Annual Research Conference, March 29 in Kansas City, Missouri. Anderson previously served a one-year term as president-elect.

“I am honored to serve as the president of MNRS.  As a new researcher, MNRS was integral to the launch of my research career, providing the opportunity network with esteemed scientist colleagues throughout the Midwest. The benefits of active engagement in MNRS have continued through the years, providing the opportunity to work together with our members to advance nursing science. I am grateful to have an opportunity to give back to MNRS as president and look forward to supporting the members and the mission.”

The mission of MNRS is to advance science, transform practice and enhance careers through a network of scholars. In her role as president of MNRS, Anderson will direct the association based on the overall mission of MNRS, update and approve strategic plans and develop and approve policies and procedures along with the rest of the Board of Directors.

MNRS focuses on developing scholars, driving science and leading innovation to improve the health of all people. The overarching goal of MNRS is to grow and retain membership, enhance products and services, allocate resources efficiently and enhance MNRS leadership opportunities and development.

Founded in 1975, MNRS provides a place for nurses to collaborate, come together to share ideas and grow the nursing field through innovative research.

November 16, 2018

In the United States there are up to 400,000 unintended patient deaths every year. Additionally, receiving healthcare is the third leading cause of death in the country. The Institute of Medicine established a goal that by 2020, 90 percent of all healthcare decisions would be evidence based. Today, only 30 percent of decisions are evidence based, which has led to patients receiving roughly 55 percent of the care that they require when entering the current healthcare system.

In an effort to bridge the gap, the Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare at The Ohio State University College of Nursing has launched the first and only globally recognized professional evidence-based practice certificate of added qualification (EBP-C). The goal of earning the EBP-C is to demonstrate the expertise that a holder uses evidence to make decisions that improve healthcare for not only patients and their families, but also healthcare providers and their practitioners. Upon completion of the CAQ, healthcare professionals in education or practice will be awarded an EBP certificate of added qualification for a period of five years.

“EBP will help us reach the Quadruple Aim in healthcare,” said Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP- FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, executive director of the Fuld Institute for EBP, vice president for health promotion, chief wellness officer, dean and professor in the College of Nursing. “Evidence-based practice increases healthcare quality and safety, decreases costs and empowers clinicians to be freely engaged and excited when they come to work every single day.”

Healthcare professionals are experiencing increased levels of burnout and dissatisfaction with their jobs. Evidence-based practice is a strategy to assist healthcare providers in meeting the Quadruple Aim. The Quadruple Aim focuses on creating better outcomes for patients, improving the patient experience, lowering costs and improving the overall clinician experience.

The EBP-C demonstrates expertise in EBP and denotes that the successful applicant has completed the required education component. While EBP may have the most immediate impact with practitioners and clinicians, educating future healthcare professionals is an important long-term outcome. In an effort to improve the future of healthcare overall, the Fuld Institute for EBP is working to embed evidence-based practice as part of every curriculum as this is how today’s students will practice as tomorrow’s professionals.

“A certificate of added qualification in evidence-based practice demonstrates that the holder is an expert in EBP,” said Cindy Beckett, PhD, RNC-OB, LCCE, CHRC, LSS-BB, director of the evidence-based practice certificate programs in the Fuld Institute for EBP and assistant professor in the College of Nursing. “Each person that obtains this certificate of added qualification can lead and mentor integration of best practice changes to positively impact individual and organizational goals.”

Visit the Fuld Institute for EBP to learn more and apply for the EBP-C program.

August 01, 2018

The National League of Nursing (NLN) announced it has named The Ohio State University College of Nursing an NLN Center of Excellence (COE). The college will be formally recognized during the Honors Convocation at the 2018 NLN Education Summit, on Friday, Sept. 14. Fifteen other nursing programs nationwide, across the academic spectrum of higher education in nursing and leading teaching hospitals and clinical sites, shared the distinction of being named NLN Centers of Excellence this year.

“This continuing designation recognizes our excellence in creating environments that enhance student learning and professional development,” said Cindy Anderson, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, ANEF, FAHA, FNAP, FAAN, associate dean for academic affairs and educational innovation and associate professor at the Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children and Youth at the College of Nursing. “The recognition is based on exceptional outcomes in socializing students to new roles, professional involvement, commitment to lifelong learning and creativity. Our innovative program design and curricula prepare graduates to LIVE WELL and to engage in high quality evidence-based practice and conduct cutting-edge research needed for the future of health and healthcare. Our exceptional faculty lead these efforts that make real differences for students and the individuals, families and communities they serve.” 

The LIVE WELL (teaching students to Lead, Innovate, Vision, Execute and be Wellness-focused, Evidence-based, Life-long learners, and Lights for the world) philosophy at the College of Nursing, Anderson said, guides the full complement of academic programs, supporting faculty in providing a learning environment that teaches students how to dream, discover and deliver.

"Congratulations to these exceptional institutions who comprise the 2018 class of NLN Centers of Excellence," said NLN President G. Rumay Alexander, EdD, RN, FAAN, associate vice chancellor for diversity and inclusion/chief diversity officer and professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. "The individuals behind this label, the faculty, deans and administrators, deserve our deepest gratitude for creating and sustaining educational excellence in nursing. COE faculty and staff bear a responsibility to share their experience, knowledge and wisdom for the benefit of everyone in nursing education."

"Centers of Excellence help raise the bar for all nursing programs by role modeling visionary leadership and environments of inclusive excellence that nurture the next generation of a strong and diverse nursing workforce to advance the health of the nation and the global community," NLN CEO Beverly Malone, PhD, RN, FAAN, said.

Each year since 2004, the NLN invites nursing schools to apply to become a COE in Nursing Education institution based on their ability to demonstrate in measurable terms sustained excellence in faculty development, nursing education research or student learning and professional development.

For more information, click here.

About the National League for Nursing
Dedicated to excellence in nursing, the National League for Nursing is the premier organization for nurse faculty and leaders in nursing education. The NLN offers faculty development, networking opportunities, testing services, nursing research grants and public policy initiatives to its more than 40,000 individual and more than 1,200 institutional members, comprising nursing education programs across the spectrum of higher education and health care organizations.

June 29, 2018

The Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) presented the Kimberly-Clark Huggies Nursing Research Award to Marliese Nist, RNC-NIC, MS, for her work entitled, “Inflammatory Mediators of Stress Exposure and Neurodevelopment in Very Preterm Infants.” The award is supported through an educational grant from the Kimberly-Clark Corporation and was presented at the 2018 AWHONN National Convention in Tampa, Florida. Nist is a PhD candidate at The Ohio State University College of Nursing.

Nist has also recently been awarded a 2018 grant from the National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN) and was one of six nurses selected nationally to receive a Heilbrunn Nurse Scholar Award. The Heilbrunn Nurse Scholar Award is given by The Rockefeller University’s Heilbrunn Family Center for Research Nursing to support nurses while they pursue independent research projects that will make a significant contribution to the discipline of nursing. The award provides a maximum of $25,000 for one or two years. Funding for the awards, now in their fifth year, is from an endowment established by sisters Helaine Lerner and Joan Rechnitz in honor of their parents, Harriet and Robert Heilbrunn.

In her doctoral research at Ohio State, Nist has been analyzing the relationships between stress exposure during the NICU hospitalization period, inflammation and neurodevelopment. Nist saw a need for study of the 28-31 week old population of preterm infants, which is responsible for a large percentage of population neurodevelopment impairments, but has not been subject to as much study as early preterm infants.

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