May 09, 2019

The National Institutes of Health/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NIH/NHLBI) has awarded a three-year, $1.2 million R01 grant to Michele Balas, PhD, RN , CCRN-K, FCCM, FAAN, associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing. This R01 will fund a research study entitled, “Determinants of Implementation Success Coordinating Ventilator, Early Ambulation and Rehabilitation Efforts in the ICU (DISCOVER-ICU).” Collaborators on the grant include Alai Tan, PhD, (Co-I) and Lorraine Mion, PhD, RN, FAAN, (Co-I) of The Ohio State University College of Nursing; Brenda T. Pun, DNP, RN (Co-I), Eduard E. Vasilevskis, MD, MPH, FHM (Co-I), and E. Wesley Ely, MD, MPH (consultant), of Vanderbilt University; and Lori A. Harmon, RRT, MBA (Co-I), of the Society of Critical Care Medicine.

“This study addresses the need to improve the care and outcomes of the millions of patients admitted to U.S. intensive care units (ICUs) annually,” Balas stated. “Persons experiencing an illness severe enough to require an ICU stay frequently experience profound physical, mental and cognitive health impairments that may persist for months to years after hospital discharge.

“Evidence demonstrates these clinical outcomes improve when integrated, interprofessional, evidence-based approaches to symptom management, mechanical ventilation and physical mobility are applied,” Balas continued. “One such approach, the ABCDEF bundle, has been associated in previous studies with lower ICU and hospital mortality rates, fewer days spent on mechanical ventilation, fewer days spent in physical restraints and lower odds of delirium and coma. Despite these proven benefits, the ABCDEF bundle has yet to be widely adopted in everyday ICU care.”

In the NIH-funded study, Balas and her team will continue their three-year partnership with the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s ICU Liberation Collaborative. The overall objective of the research is to develop multilevel implementation strategies to enhance sustainable adoption of the ABCDEF bundle in routine ICU practice. The team is particularly interested in discovering how various patient-, provider-, and organization-level characteristics and implementation strategies effect ABCDEF bundle adoption.

The results of this work aim to lead directly to the development of implementation strategies that are adaptable, responsive to the needs of the critical care community and accountable for the cultural and organizational factors necessary to increase ABCDEF bundle adoption.

“Our team is thrilled to lead this important line of investigation. We firmly believe that better integration of the evidence-based ABCDEF bundle has the potential to substantially reduce the short- and long-term physical, cognitive and emotional burden critical illness imposes on critically ill adults and their family members.”


Tate awarded NIH/NIA grant

The National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging (NIH/NIA) has awarded a two-year, $312,000 grant to fund the study, “A Problem Solving Intervention for Post-ICU Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults.”

The grant was awarded to Judith Tate, PhD, RN (PI), assistant professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Co-investigators include Lorraine C. Mion, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Alai Tan, PhD, of the College of Nursing, and Jennifer Bogner, PhD, ABPP, FACRM, of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in the College of Medicine. The grant will run from April 15, 2019, to March 31, 2021.

“Older adults comprise more than half of all intensive care unit (ICU) days and are at risk of delirium, a common acute brain impairment associated with increased risk for dementia and altered trajectories of cognitive recovery,” the grant proposal states. “The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and early efficacy of a problem-solving intervention, Post Intensive Care Unit Problem Solving (PIC-UPS) in the home setting for older adult ICU survivors suffering from post-ICU cognitive impairment.”

February 14, 2019
College ranks #13 among all nursing colleges, #6 among public institutions

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Ohio State University College of Nursing has made a significant leap in National Institutes of Health (NIH) ranking, placing it among the top 15 nursing colleges in the country. NIH rankings released this week show the College of Nursing at #13 overall and #6 among public institutions, with approximately $4.3 million in NIH research funding.

The College of Nursing ranked #20 last year and #31 two years ago.

“The NIH’s continued and increasing investment in our research at the College of Nursing demonstrates the outstanding quality of our research leadership, faculty and the staff who support them,” said Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, chief wellness officer and dean of the College of Nursing. “We are dreaming, discovering and delivering a healthier world with our faculty’s innovative and cutting-edge research that is truly transforming care and improving lives in real-world settings. I am deeply inspired by their work.”

“Our researchers are incredibly dedicated and passionate in their pursuit of science to prevent or relieve suffering, improve illness recovery, and help people live healthier lives,” said Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, associate dean for research and innovation at the College of Nursing. “It is not only rewarding to receive this level of investment from the NIH, but it is also motivating for us to keep exploring what we are capable of delivering to improve health and well-being across the life-span.”

 

College of Nursing research newly funded by the NIH this year includes:
Interdisciplinary study of Alzheimer’s patients

A five-year grant from NIH and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) is funding the study, “Sex Differences in Pain Reports and Brain Activation in Older Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease.” The grant was awarded to Todd Monroe, PhD, RN-BC, FNAP, FGSA, FAAN, associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Monroe’s interdisciplinary team includes faculty from the College of Nursing, the Departments of Neurology and Geriatrics, and the Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging at Ohio State, as well as collaborators from Vanderbilt University. The study is examining gender and Alzheimer’s-related differences in verbal pain reporting patterns and how they are displayed in regional and network brain function, with an aim to lead to better pain management.

 

Improving the health and well-being of older adults

A five-year grant from NIH and NIA is funding the interdisciplinary study, “Impact of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Oral Therapy on Healing of Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers in Older Adults.” The grant was awarded to Jodi McDaniel, PhD, RN, who is an associate professor and the graduate studies committee chair at The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Co-investigators include Alai Tan, MD, PhD, of the College of Nursing, and College of Medicine faculty Guibin Li, MD, PhD, Narasimham Parinandi, PhD, and Sashwati Roy, PhD. This project is testing a new oral nutrient therapy, and the project’s findings are expected to advance wound healing science.

 

Caring for infants with Down Syndrome and congenital heart disease

Tondi Harrison, PhD, RN, FAAN received an award to fund an administrative supplement to the study, “Behavioral and physiological responses to oral feeding in infants with complex congenital heart disease.” The supplement, from NIH’s INCLUDE program (INvestigation of Co-occurring conditions across the Lifespan to Understand Down SyndromE), will support the addition of infants who have both Down syndrome and congenital heart disease to the study. Harrison is an associate professor in the College of Nursing.

 

Helping pregnant women at-risk for complications

A three-year career development grant was awarded to Shannon Gillespie, PhD, RN, assistant professor, Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children and Youth. Her study, “Maternal Immune Responsiveness as Clinical Target for Preterm Birth Prevention” (The MIRACL Study) is testing a novel method of identifying women at risk for inflammatory preterm birth and determining whether specific preventive interventions are likely to offer benefit during the pregnancy.

 

Examining the role of fathers in birth outcomes

A grant entitled “Paternal Role in Adverse Birth Outcomes in Black Families” is a multi-university project awarded to: Carmen Giurgescu, PhD, RN, WHNP, associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing; Cleopatra Caldwell, PhD, of University of Michigan; and Dawn Phillips Misra, PhD, at Wayne State University. The study aims to add another dimension to efforts to reduce racial disparities in successful birth outcomes.

 

The College of Nursing is currently hiring new faculty who are committed to transforming health and transforming lives. You can find job openings in the college here.

October 19, 2018

This fall, The Ohio State University College of Nursing received a total of over $9 million in new grant funding for research from a variety of prestigious institutions, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the American Cancer Society, the Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation, the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, and others.

“Three of these awards are particularly significant as the proposed studies are part of exciting and important interdisciplinary work led by College of Nursing faculty who are early stage investigators, which means that they are receiving their first R01 or equivalent research grant. The future looks bright for nursing and transdisciplinary science in our college,” stated Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, associate dean for research and innovation in The Ohio State University College of Nursing.

NIH funds College of Nursing research

The National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research (NIH/NINR) awarded a $191 K grant to Tondi Harrison, PhD, RN,FAAN, (PI) to fund an administrative supplement to the study, “Behavioral and physiological responses to oral feeding in infants with complex congenital heart disease.” The supplement, from NIH’s INCLUDE program (INvestigation of Co-occurring conditions across the Lifespan to Understand Down SyndromE), will support the addition of infants who have both Down syndrome and congenital heart disease to the study. Harrison is an associate professor in the College of Nursing.

The NIH/NINR also awarded a $423 K, three-year career development grant to Shannon Gillespie, PhD, RN, assistant professor, Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children & Youth. Her study, “Maternal Immune Responsiveness as Clinical Target for Preterm Birth Prevention” (The MIRACL Study) will test a novel method of identifying women at risk for inflammatory preterm birth and determining whether specific preventive interventions are likely to offer benefit during the pregnancy.

Recent grants from the NIH also include a $3.3 million NIH/NIA R01 to Todd Monroe, PhD, RN-BC, FNAP, FGSA, FAAN, (PI); a $2.8 million NIH/NIA R01 to Jodi McDaniel, PhD, RN, (PI) and colleagues, and a $1.8 million NIH/NINR R01 to Carmen Giurgescu, PhD, RN, WHNP, and colleagues at Wayne State University.

“All of our new NIH funding provides evidence of the fantastic cutting-edge research being conducted by our nationally renowned faculty and the terrific research infrastructure that is provided by our college so that our faculty can achieve their dreams and produce major positive impact through their work,” stated Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer and dean and professor in the College of Nursing.

Other prestigious institutions support College of Nursing research

The American Cancer Society awarded a five-year, $1.7 million grant to Jennifer Kue, PhD, for the Intergenerational Refugee and Immigrant Cancer Screening Project.

The National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners awarded a foundation grant to Assistant Professor Lisa Kinsella Militello, PhD, MPH, RN, CPNP, to fund the study, “A Solution-Focused Approach: What Low-Income Parents with Young Children Need from Stress-Regulation Smartphone Apps.” IT Project Scientist Emre Sezgin, PhD, of Nationwide Children’s Hospital is a co-investigator on the project.

The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation awarded a grant to Pam Lusk, DNP, RN, FAANP, clinical associate professor, for the study, “Integrating Adolescent Substance Abuse Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) throughout Social Work and Nursing Education.”

The Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation awarded grants to  Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, (PI) and colleagues and  Laureen Smith, PhD, RN, FAAN, (PI) and colleagues.

October 01, 2018

The National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging (NIH/NIA) has awarded a five-year, $2.8 million R01 grant to fund the study, “Impact of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Oral Therapy on Healing of Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers in Older Adults.” The grant was awarded to Jodi McDaniel, PhD, RN, (PI), who is an associate professor and the graduate studies committee chair at The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Co-investigators include Alai Tan, MD, PhD, of the College of Nursing, and College of Medicine faculty Guibin Li, MD, PhD, Narasimham Parinandi, PhD, and Sashwati Roy, PhD.

The project addresses the global problem of chronic venous leg ulcers (CVLUs), recurring wounds causing considerable infirmity for an estimated 9.7 million people every year, mainly older adults with comorbidities. CLVUs can cause disability, hospitalization and death among older adults. The project tests a new oral nutrient therapy containing the bioactive elements of fish oil, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid for targeting and reducing the high numbers of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes in ulcer microenvironments that keep CVLUs “trapped” in a chronic inflammatory state and prevent healing. The project findings are expected to advance wound healing science and lead to a new low-risk adjunct oral therapy to stimulate the healing of CVLUs.

“New therapies for CVLUs are needed because standard topical therapies are often ineffective or yield only short-term healing,” the investigators stated in their proposal. The project aims to reduce the high healthcare costs associated with treatments and mitigate the negative impact CVLUs have on quality of life in aging.

Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, Associate Dean for Research and Innovation in the College of Nursing stated, "Dr. McDaniel's study is the third R01 grant from the National Institute on Aging awarded to College of Nursing researchers over the past year, showing the college's deep commitment to building science to improve the health and well-being of older adults."

September 18, 2018

The National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research (NIH/NINR) has awarded a $1.8 million R01 grant to fund the study titled, “Paternal Role in Adverse Birth Outcomes in Black Families.” The multiple-PI grant was awarded to Carmen Giurgescu, PhD, RN, WHNP, associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing, Cleopatra Caldwell, PhD, of University of Michigan and Dawn Phillips Misra, PhD, at Wayne State University. The study was funded from September, 2018 to June, 2022.

According to the PIs, “the few studies that have explored paternal effects on birth outcomes have generally excluded understanding the dynamic, complex, and often correlated maternal-paternal relationship…studies often have been limited to an examination of paternal age, occupation, or socioeconomic status. The proposed study will assess whether and how fathers may have an impact on successful birth outcomes.”

“Black women are more likely to have adverse birth outcomes such as preterm birth and low birthweight infants compared with White women,” said Giurgescu. “Although the literature has identified a number of risk factors for adverse birth outcomes associated with mothers, little attention has been given to understanding the role of fathers on birth outcomes. Our study will consider the role of social determinants of health, specifically disadvantaged neighborhoods and experiences of racial discrimination for expectant fathers, and their influences on expectant parents’ mental health and birth outcomes among Black families. We will also measure maternal and paternal telomere length, a biological indicator of chronic stress, and its relationship to adverse birth outcomes.”

The study aims to add another dimension to efforts to reduce racial disparities. “This information can serve as the foundation for recommendations aimed at family-centered interventions to reduce adverse birth outcomes," Giurgescu stated.

September 17, 2018

The National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging (NIH/NIA) has awarded a five-year, $3.3 million R01 grant to fund the study titled, “Sex Differences in Pain Reports and Brain Activation in Older Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease.” The grant was awarded to Todd Monroe, PhD, RN-BC, FNAP, FGSA, FAAN, (PI) associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing.

Monroe’s interdisciplinary team will include faculty from the College of Nursing, the Departments of Neurology and Geriatrics, and the Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging at Ohio State, as well as collaborators from Vanderbilt University.

“Older adults with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are at risk of having their pain undertreated. We do know that healthy males and females experience pain differently. It is not known if these sex-differences extend into the AD population. This study will provide research focused on better management of pain in people with AD,” Monroe stated in the proposal. “Poorly treated pain in older adults with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a critical public health problem and understanding sex and AD-related differences in pain function is an NIA priority area.”

The proposal stated that when compared to healthy adults, and in the presence of similarly known painful conditions, older adults with AD receive less pain medication. Reasons for this discrepancy are poorly understood. Meanwhile, inadequately treated pain negatively impacts quality of life and increases health care costs.

The research will examine how verbal pain reporting patterns in responses to acute experimental thermal pain differs between older males and females with and without AD and how these sex-differences map onto regional and network brain functional changes. The study aims to determine whether sensory (stimulus intensity) and affective (stimulus unpleasantness) responses differ by sex in people with and without AD during cutaneous thermal stimulation. Examining baseline differences in experimental thermal pain between males and females with and without AD will provide a foundation for understanding factors that may contribute to untreated pain risk, as well as for developing sex-specific novel assessment, prevention, and treatment strategies in the older population with AD.

February 26, 2018

The College of Nursing at The Ohio State University has moved from No. 31 to No. 20 in research funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The NIH provides the largest amount of publicly funded biological research support in the country. 

“We are delighted to propel to the top 20 in NIH funding among colleges of nursing throughout the country, which is testimony to the innovative and significant research being conducted by our talented faculty and PhD students,” said Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/PMHNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, Ohio State vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer and dean of the College of Nursing. "In addition to recognizing the research programs underway in our college, this accomplishment reflects the stellar leadership of Mary Beth Happ, PhD, our associate dean for research and innovation, and her team, which supports faculty and PhD students through the process of formulating meaningful research questions, developing impactful studies and then writing and submitting grants to fund their work.”

The Ohio State University College of Nursing has more than $3 million in NIH funding. Projects range from several studies on measuring physiological indicators of stress to determine negative effects on various populations to developing a reliable method for predicting who will develop Alzheimer’s long before symptoms appear.

Here are additional details from a sampling of current studies: 

 

Preventing preterm births in African-American women

Professor Carmen Giurgescu, PhD, RN, WHNP, is looking at social stressors that can lead to inflammation conditions, which may in turn lead to preterm births among African-American women. “African-American women are one-and-a-half times more likely to have a preterm birth compared to non-Hispanic white women,” explained Giurgescu. She has spent the past 10 years looking at other studies and developing mixed methods of determining the factors that may cause this. They’ve conducted quantitative studies along with qualitative interviews, and utilized mixed methods of data analysis. They learned that women who experience racial discrimination have elevated cortisol levels as well as several other physiological indicators that can lead to preterm birth. While social support can mitigate the effects of stressors, much more research is needed to fully understand how to support African-American women to prevent preterm births.

Melnyk and co-principal investigator Susan Genaro, PhD, dean and professor of the William F. Connell School of Nursing at Boston College, were recently funded by the NIH to test a cognitive behavioral skills building (CBSB) prenatal care intervention for pregnant minority women experiencing emotional distress. “Given the well established link between emotional distress, poor health and birth outcomes and the prevalence of emotional distress in minority women, prenatal care interventions designed to improve mental and physical health outcomes for these women are vital,” said Melnyk.  It will be the first clinical trial to test a CBSB health promotion intervention embedded into prenatal care for emotionally distressed minority pregnant women.

 

Understanding adolescent stress

Associate Professor Jodi Ford, PhD, RN, is the director of stress science in the College of Nursing Biomedical Research Lab. She is particularly focused on non-invasive methods of collecting physiological measurements of stress in order to determine stress levels in adolescents. They conducted a training session on the background and measurement process of using hair cortisol. Patients do not seem to mind having a small piece of their hair cut off for the study; they have found it much easier than a blood sample. A current study tests a high-quality, feasible and cost-effective protocol for the collection of chronic-stress biomarkers to investigate the biological impact of social risk on adolescent health and behavior.

 

Predicting Alzheimer’s disease

Associate Professor and Director of Biomedical Research Loren Wold, PhD, FAHA, FAPS, and two of his colleagues may be on their way to developing a reliable method for predicting who will develop Alzheimer’s long before symptoms appear. Officially titled “Mechanisms of exposure-induced tissue functional and pathological changes in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s Disease,” the project grew out of studies Wold began years ago to measure the impact of air pollution on mice. They initially specialized in the effects of particles and air pollution on the heart, Wold explained. But when the mice in his studies were exposed to concentrated amounts of pollution for extended periods of time to determine the effect on their hearts, he also observed changes in their behavior, “very similar to what you see in a mouse that has Alzheimer’s disease.” Further examination revealed that a protein associated with the development of Alzheimer’s was showing up in the hearts of the mice. Meanwhile, research by Wold’s colleague found a similar result in research on humans. Wold’s research, which also shows a worrisome link between air pollution and Alzheimer’s, could play a role in the eventual development of effective Alzheimer’s treatments. “If we can somehow delay the progression of this protein from the heart to the brain, we might ultimately be able to stop or at least delay the progression of the protein to the brain,” Wold said.

January 20, 2018
  1. FloAnn Easton Professor of Pediatric and Adolescent Health
  2. Grayce Sills Professorship in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing
  3. Director, Center for Women, Children and Youth


Institution

The Ohio State University College of Nursing has embarked on a new era of excellence, led by Associate Vice President for Health Promotion, University Chief Wellness Officer, and Dean of the College of Nursing Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN. Under her leadership, the college is engaged in bold new strategic initiatives to lead cutting-edge transdisciplinary research that impacts outcomes in real-world settings. The college is located on the largest health sciences campus in the country and is one of seven health science colleges at Ohio State with outstanding collaborations with the world renowned Ohio State Wexner Medical Center and the Ohio State James Comprehensive Cancer Center. The college has three nationally renowned centers of excellence, including the Center for Women, Children and Youth, the Center of Excellence in Critical and Complex Care and the Center for Transdisciplinary Evidence-based Practice. It offers robust PhD and DNP programs as well as several other outstanding graduate and baccalaureate degrees. Faculty and students in the college are engaged in a wide variety of cutting-edge research in basic, biological and clinical research to improve health outcomes across the lifespan. Bold new research initiatives have been launched, including a recently funded National Institutes of Health/National Institute for Nursing Research T32 in child health. These two endowed professors will conduct cutting-edge research that impacts outcomes and mentor junior faculty as well as pre- and post-doctoral fellows. The Director of the Center for Women, Children and Youth will lead an outstanding group of faculty to expand the science and impact of research to improve outcomes in those populations. These are all 12-month positions, and continued NIH-funding is an expectation.

 

Qualifications

  • Successful candidates will hold an earned PhD in nursing or related health discipline.
  • a curriculum vitae consistent with appointment at the full professor (preferred) or associate professor rank 
  • history of sustained NIH and other extra-mural funded research 
  • commitment to diversity, innovation and transdisciplinary research and scholarship
  • track record of leadership in mentoring students and faculty in research and scholarship 
  • track record of transdisciplinary collaboration
  • excellent communication and team-building skills

 

Responsibilities

  • conducts extramurally funded research, preferably from NIH
  • mentors faculty and doctoral students in research program development 
  • provides strategic leadership to the research centers within the college
  • leads and/or assists with the development of center and T32 grant applications 
  • implements strategic initiatives related to research and scholarship development

 

All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status or protected veteran status.

Inquiries, nominations, or applications (including a cover letter, curriculum vitae and names of three references) should be directed electronically and in confidence to:

Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/PMHNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN
Associate Vice President for Health Promotion
University Chief Wellness Officer
Dean and Professor, College of Nursing
Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry, College of Medicine
melnyk.15@osu.edu

September 27, 2017

Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/PMHNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, has been awarded a $3.3 million, 4.5-year R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute for Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIH/NIMHD) for a study entitled, “Healthy Lifestyle Intervention for High-Risk Minority Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.” Melnyk is vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer, dean and professor of the College of Nursing, professor of pediatrics and psychiatry in the College of Medicine and executive director of the Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for EBP at The Ohio State University. Co-PI Susan Gennaro, PhD, RN, FAAN, is dean and professor of the William F. Connell School of Nursing at Boston College.

 

Citing the public health mandate issued by the United States Department of Health and Human Services to decrease disparities in birth outcomes based on race and ethnicity, the study proposes to test a cognitive behavioral skills building (CBSB) prenatal care intervention for pregnant minority women experiencing emotional distress. If successful, it could be widely scaled to improve pregnancy, birth and post-natal outcomes nationally. The randomized, controlled trial (RCT) will test the efficacy of a CBSB health promotion intervention adapted from Melnyk’s other evidence-based CBSB interventions.

 

Melnyk emphasizes that “while screening for depression in all pregnant women is a recent public health directive, screening alone without scalable, evidence-based interventions to improve mental health will not produce positive outcomes. Given the well-established link between emotional distress, poor health and birth outcomes and the prevalence of emotional distress in minority women, prenatal care interventions designed to improve mental and physical health outcomes for these women are vital.”

 

The RCT, to be conducted in New York and Ohio, will extend Melnyk’s research on cognitive behavioral interventions to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors, physical health and psychosocial wellness and Gennaro’s research on the consequences of stress and health behaviors in pregnant minority women. It will be the first clinical trial to test a CBSB health promotion intervention embedded into prenatal care for emotionally distressed minority pregnant women.

September 25, 2017

Loren Wold, PhD, FAHA, FCVS, associate professor and director of biomedical research at The Ohio State University College of Nursing, has been awarded a $1.56 million four-year grant from the National Institutes of Health/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH/NHLBI) for the study entitled, “Defining the Impact of E-cigarettes on Cardiac Pathophysiology.” This study will be performed in collaboration with Philip Binkley, MD; Paul Janssen, PhD, FAHA; Ahmet Kilic, MD; and Peter Mohler, PhD, of The Ohio State University College of Medicine.

The study points out that while conventional cigarettes and air pollution have already been linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes, little is known about the effects of e-cigarettes. Calling e-cigarettes a “new source of emissions” of toxic gasses and fine particulate matter, the study states, “It remains unknown if e-cigarette use increases inflammation and fibrosis long-term, leading to structural and functional damage to heart and vasculature.” The study proposes to define the impact of e-cigarette aerosol exposure on cardiac physiology,  the function of key cardiac cell populations and key primary human cardiac cell populations. 

“The increased use of e-cigarettes is alarming, particularly because there is limited data on how the heart is affected by exposure from e-cigarette smoke,” said Wold.

Wold’s lab work focuses on external triggers of cardiovascular disease, with special emphasis on the role of cancer cachexia and air pollution, investigating how the cardiovascular system is affected by these stressors. He is currently principal investigator (PI) of two other NIH R01-funded studies: “mechanisms of exposure-induced tissue functional and pathological changes in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s Disease,” and “muscle function and depression-like behavior in a mouse model of cancer fatigue.” In addition, he is co-investigator of a new (effective Sep. 1, 2017) R01-funded study of the effects of World Trade Center dust on cardiopulmonary function.

At The Ohio State University, Wold is involved in training undergraduates, graduate students, medical students and postdoctoral Fellows in basic lab techniques, as well as tools for effective manuscript and grant writing. He also serves as the editor-in-chief of the Elsevier journal Life Sciences.