September 25, 2017

Loren Wold, PhD, FAHA, FCVS, associate professor and director of biomedical research at The Ohio State University College of Nursing, has been awarded a $1.56 million four-year grant from the National Institutes of Health/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH/NHLBI) for the study entitled, “Defining the Impact of E-cigarettes on Cardiac Pathophysiology.” This study will be performed in collaboration with Philip Binkley, MD; Paul Janssen, PhD, FAHA; Ahmet Kilic, MD; and Peter Mohler, PhD, of The Ohio State University College of Medicine.

The study points out that while conventional cigarettes and air pollution have already been linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes, little is known about the effects of e-cigarettes. Calling e-cigarettes a “new source of emissions” of toxic gasses and fine particulate matter, the study states, “It remains unknown if e-cigarette use increases inflammation and fibrosis long-term, leading to structural and functional damage to heart and vasculature.” The study proposes to define the impact of e-cigarette aerosol exposure on cardiac physiology,  the function of key cardiac cell populations and key primary human cardiac cell populations. 

“The increased use of e-cigarettes is alarming, particularly because there is limited data on how the heart is affected by exposure from e-cigarette smoke,” said Wold.

Wold’s lab work focuses on external triggers of cardiovascular disease, with special emphasis on the role of cancer cachexia and air pollution, investigating how the cardiovascular system is affected by these stressors. He is currently principal investigator (PI) of two other NIH R01-funded studies: “mechanisms of exposure-induced tissue functional and pathological changes in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s Disease,” and “muscle function and depression-like behavior in a mouse model of cancer fatigue.” In addition, he is co-investigator of a new (effective Sep. 1, 2017) R01-funded study of the effects of World Trade Center dust on cardiopulmonary function.

At The Ohio State University, Wold is involved in training undergraduates, graduate students, medical students and postdoctoral Fellows in basic lab techniques, as well as tools for effective manuscript and grant writing. He also serves as the editor-in-chief of the Elsevier journal Life Sciences.

July 12, 2017

Loren Wold, PhD, FAHA, FCVS, associate professor and director of biomedical research at The Ohio State University College of Nursing has been awarded a $3.89 million grant from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging (NIH/NIA) for his study entitled “Mechanisms of exposure-induced tissue functional and pathological changes in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s Disease.” This study will be performed in collaboration with Colin Combs, department chair for biomedical sciences at University of North Dakota, and Federica del Monte, PhD, MD, associate professor at the Medical University of South Carolina. 

Citing statistics from the World Health Organization, the study states that exposure to ambient pollution is responsible for more than 13 million deaths annually and has been associated with cardiovascular morbidity, mortality and poorer cognitive function in the aging population. “Alzheimer dementia and heart failure are a growing plague worldwide, [and] the recognition of their combinatory triggers and potential coexistence is an alarming prospective.” The study proposes to explore the role and mechanisms by which air pollution induces the development and progression of brain and heart diseases, both of which are worsened by exposures.

“Our overall goal is to determine the time course of plaque formation in the brains and hearts of animals with Alzheimer’s, in order to potentially define a biomarker for Alzheimer’s disease,” Wold said. “Recent discoveries by collaborator Dr. del Monte at Harvard Medical School (now at the Medical University of South Carolina) determined that beta-amyloid plaques, the plaques known to cause neurocognitive effects in [the hearts of] patients with Alzheimer’s disease, are also present in the brain of these patients. We are now poised to determine whether the plaques form in the heart prior to the brain.” If so, Wold and his associates hope to find a way to prevent the neurological issues associated with Alzheimer’s disease by quenching the protein aggregates in the heart before they spread to the brain.

Wold has also been funded by the NIH for his work focused on external triggers of cardiovascular disease, with special emphasis on the role of cancer cachexia and air pollution, investigating how the cardiovascular system is affected by these stressors.

At The Ohio State University, Wold is involved in training undergraduates, graduate students, medical students and postdoctoral Fellows in basic lab techniques as well as tools for effective manuscript and grant writing. He also serves as the editor-in-chief of the Elsevier journal Life Sciences.

April 19, 2016

Summit planned for Oct. 18-20, 2017, to officially launch the Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare

A transformational $6.5 million grant has been awarded to The Ohio State University College of Nursing to establish The Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare. This institute will be the national hub for the teaching of best practices to improve healthcare quality and patient outcomes, working with healthcare systems to implement and sustain evidence-based practice (EBP), and conducting research to determine best strategies to translate evidence-based interventions into real world clinical settings.

“This hugely impactful grant will enable us to rapidly accelerate our current efforts with nursing colleges and healthcare systems across the United States to teach, implement and sustain EBP,” said Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/PMHNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, associate vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer and dean of the College of Nursing. “The Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare is urgently needed to revolutionize the future of healthcare and ensure the best patient outcomes.”

EBP is a problem-solving approach to the delivery of healthcare that integrates the best evidence from well-designed studies with a clinician’s expertise and patients’ preferences and values. Multiple studies have shown that evidence-based practice improves healthcare quality and patient outcomes while reducing costs.

“Evidence-based practice by clinicians from all disciplines is critical to improving healthcare quality and patient outcomes as well as reducing costs,” said Ohio State President Michael V. Drake. “We are grateful for the opportunity to advance our patient care and nursing education while serving as a national model for evidence-based practice and working with other institutions across the nation.”

The new institute will accelerate and expand the efforts of the College of Nursing’s Center for Transdisciplinary Evidence-based Practice (CTEP), including:

  • working with nursing faculty across the nation to integrate EBP throughout their curriculums to produce the highest caliber of evidence-based nursing graduates
  • educating nursing students at all levels and nurses on how to access the latest gold standards of care and also how to implement as well as to sustain EBP
  • assisting nursing leaders and in hospitals and healthcare systems to advance and sustain evidence-based care to improve the safety and quality of care that is provided to patients and families
  • conducting research on the most effective interventions to teach and rapidly accelerate the translation of evidence-based interventions into clinical settings
  • providing a web site of the best practices and resources to enhance healthcare quality and core performance metrics
  • conducting national webinars and summits on the best and latest evidence to guide the best nursing practice

“In Buckeye Nation, we teach everyone to dream big and accomplish the impossible to transform healthcare and transform lives. We also walk the talk,” said Melnyk, who will lead the efforts of the new national institute with her colleague Lynn Gallagher-Ford, PhD, RN, DPFNAP, NE-BC, current director of the Center for Transdisciplinary Evidence-based Practice at the college. “The Ohio State University College of Nursing is indeed a place where dreams become reality.”

Melnyk is an internationally renowned leader in EBP and intervention research. She is the author of the book Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare: A Guide to Best Practice, now in its third edition, and the editor of the journal Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing. She and Gallagher-Ford, also a nationally recognized expert in EBP, recently published research in Worldviews, showing that implementation of EBP among chief nurses and their hospitals is relatively low.

The Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute is the nation's largest private funder devoted exclusively to nursing students and nursing education. In 1935, Leonhard Felix Fuld and his sister, Florentine, created a foundation in honor of their mother, Helene.

The Ohio State University College of Nursing is the world’s preeminent college known for accomplishing what is considered impossible through its transformational leadership and innovation in nursing and health, EBP and unsurpassed wellness. As part of the largest health science campus in the United States, the College of Nursing offers seven innovative academic programs. The college’s graduate nursing programs are among the top four percent in the country, according to U.S. News and World Report, while its online graduate program is ranked 4th, and its RN to BSN program is ranked 7th as part of Ohio State’s ranking for online bachelor’s degree programs. Annual college enrollment is nearly 2,000 students. The college celebrated its centennial in 2014.

February 18, 2016

Grant is part of a national initiative to support 1,000 nurse scholars in all 50 states

The Ohio State University College of Nursing announced today that, with a new grant of $30,000 from the Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare, matched by $30,000 of its own monies, it will fund the scholarship of three doctoral nursing students in 2016. As a recipient of the Jonas Center grant, the college is part of a national effort to stem the faculty shortage and prepare the next generation of nurses, as a clinical-nurse shortage is anticipated just as an aging population requires care.

The College of Nursing’s Jonas Scholars join more than 1,000 future nurse educators and leaders at 140 universities across all 50 states supported by Jonas Center programs, the Jonas Nurse Leaders Scholars Program and Jonas Veterans Healthcare Program (JVHP). These scholarships support nurses pursuing PhDs and DNPs, the terminal degrees in the field.

“We are so pleased to receive this grant from the Jonas Center as it provides our doctoral students financial support as well as opportunities for networking and collaboration on a national level,” said College of Nursing Dean Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/PMHNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN. “This grant further increases our ability to recruit and prepare outstanding doctoral students, who upon graduating, will have a tremendous impact on the education of future nurses and ultimately on the health of people around the globe.”

As the nation’s leading philanthropic funder of graduate-nursing education, the Jonas Center is addressing the critical need for qualified nursing faculty. U.S. nursing schools turned away nearly 70,000 qualified applicants from baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs in 2014 due in large part to an insufficient number of faculty. Further, nearly two-thirds of registered nurses over age 54 say they are considering retirement.

“In 2008, we set an ambitious goal to support 1,000 Jonas Nurse Scholars. This year, on our Center’s 10th anniversary, we celebrate this achievement and are amazed by the talent of this cohort of future nurse leaders,” said Donald Jonas, who co-founded the Center with his wife Barbara Jonas. “In the decade to come, we look forward to continuing to work with our partner nursing schools and to the great impact that the Jonas Scholars will have on improving healthcare around the world.”

Ohio State’s College of Nursing Jonas Scholars will begin their graduate careers in the fall and will be supported through 2018.

 

About The Ohio State University College of Nursing

The Ohio State University College of Nursing is the world’s preeminent college known for accomplishing what is considered impossible through its transformational leadership and innovation in nursing and health, evidence-based practice and unsurpassed wellness. As part of the largest health sciences campus in the U.S., the College of Nursing offers seven innovative academic programs. The college’s graduate nursing programs are among the top five percent in the country, according to U.S. News and World Report, while its online graduate program is ranked 4th and its RN to BSN program is ranked 7th as part of Ohio State’s ranking for online bachelor’s degree programs. Annual college enrollment is approximately 1,950 students. The college celebrated its centennial in 2014.

March 20, 2013

The Ohio State University College of Nursing and Making a Difference, Inc. have teamed up to win a $60,000 grant from The Ohio State University Office of Outreach and Engagement to address health disparities by implementing a comprehensive community health and wellness program in a Near East Side neighborhood of Columbus, Ohio.

The health and wellness program, called “Making a Difference: Health and Wellness One Street at a Time,” will engage residents of the Mount Vernon community in health screenings and treatment for common diagnoses of hypertension, heart diseases and depression. According to Columbus Public Health statistics, African Americans in Franklin County, Ohio, were 2.6 times more likely to die from diabetes and hypertension, and stroke mortality rates were 2.7 times higher than that of white people in the same area. 

“We have been long engaged with the health of the communities we serve, and this award gives us additional resources to integrate community engagement into our curriculum and strategic plan, using a model that includes faculty, staff and students and, very importantly, community partners,” said Usha Menon, PhD, RN, FAAN, vice dean, professor and principal investigator of the College of Nursing grant. “Our dream is for 'Making A Difference: One Street at a Time,' to serve as an exemplar for sustainable and transformational community engagement.”

Nursing students will gain a wide range of clinical experience in health disparities as they screen and educate residents about health and wellness prevention and self-management approaches. The college will conduct “Ask a Buckeye Nurse” forums at health and wellness expos and area barbershops; students will also assess general community needs through neighborhood windshield and walking surveys. Faculty and graduate students will be able to apply findings into effective evidence-based healthcare practices and public policy.

Make a Difference, Inc. focuses on increasing awareness of health and wellness, providing support through life-enhancement strategies to Mount Vernon community residents, creating awareness of neighborhood safety issues and decreasing juvenile delinquency.

“'Make a Difference' is honored to partner with the college to improve the neighborhood we know, love and worship in,” said Al Edmondson, founder and director. “Not only will we be able to address the high levels of diabetes and infant mortality in the community, we can show through this partnership that Ohio State cares about the community and will help with its rebirth.”

“It is a privilege for the college to work with Al Edmondson and the Mount Vernon community," Menon said. "True community work begins with a collaborative enterprise between the university and the community.  This initiative exemplifies the principles of community-centered participatory research and service.”

The program is guided by a social-ecological model and community-campus partnership principles. The ecological approach leverages public policy, community organization support and research to produce a collaborative approach that centers on community residents.

“We are going to continue to increase awareness with health expos involving the faith-based communities to create a healthier community,” Edmonso said.

Educational and translational research opportunities will involve several Ohio State health sciences colleges.

Among the community partners is the Eldon and Elsie Ward Family YMCA located in Columbus’ Near East Side. The YMCA provides health and wellness activities and programs for area children, youth and families and will provide assistance with fitness activities and space for events. Several neighborhood churches, such as Broad Street Presbyterian Church, St. Philip Lutheran Church and Saint Dominic Roman Catholic Church, will be involved in assisting with the expos and health screenings of residents.

College of Nursing faculty and researchers involved in the grant include Jennifer Kue, PhD, assistant professor; Linda Daley, PhD, associate professor; Barbara Warren, PhD, RN, CNS-BC, PMH, FAAN, professor; Karen Clancy, MS, RN, clinical instructor; Laura Szalacha, EdD, associate director and research associate professor, Madhurima Sarkar, PhD, Paula D’Auteuil, MS, APRN-BC, professor emeritus.

The Engagement Impact Grants Program provided by Ohio State’s Office of Outreach and Engagement supports innovative and creative outreach and engagement initiatives that connect academic excellence with societal needs as part of Ohio State’s land grant heritage; it enhances and creates partnerships between members of the university community and community supporters and enhances development of a unit’s outreach and engagement mission. The Engagement Impact Grant Program has a proven record of success, with metrics demonstrating an approximate 14:1 return.

 

About The Ohio State University College of Nursing

The Ohio State University College of Nursing is the world’s preeminent college known for transforming health and transforming lives through innovative academic programs and research that improves outcomes and evidence-based clinical practice. We exist to revolutionize healthcare and promote the highest levels of wellness in diverse individuals and communities throughout the nation and globe. The College of Nursing is part of the largest health sciences campus in the nation that is comprised of seven colleges, including dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, optometry, public health and veterinary medicine. Please visit us at nursing.osu.edu.

May 02, 2012

Jodi Ford, PhD, RN, assistant professor at The Ohio State University College of Nursing, has been awarded a seed grant from Ohio State’s Initiative in Population Research (IPR) for her study "Linking Biological and Social Pathways to Adolescent Health."

 

Ford’s pilot study tests a high-quality, feasible and cost-effective protocol for the collection of chronic-stress biomarkers to investigate the biological impact of social risk on adolescent health and behavior. The biomarker data collection will be conducted with principal investigator Christopher R. Browning, PhD, a professor of sociology at Ohio State, in a recently funded National Institutes of Health (NIH) and William T. Grant prospective cohort study of adolescents in Franklin County on "Adolescent Health and Development in Context." Browning and Donna McCarthy, PhD, RN, a professor at the College of Nursing, are co-investigators on the IPR pilot study.

 

The Ohio State’s IPR extends four to eight seed grants annually to faculty affiliates for work toward submission of proposals for external funding.

 

Ford’s primary program of research under her designation as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholar for 2010-2013 focuses on the contribution of social contexts to adolescent and young adult health and the psychosocial, behavioral and biological pathways through which they operate.