April 23, 2020

Health and well-being hub represents an innovative first step towards addressing burnout and associated mental health issues among nurses nationwide

Trusted Health, the career platform for the modern nurse, and The Ohio State University College of Nursing today announced a new initiative to promote mental health and well-being among nurses on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. The program will be piloted with nurses in New York and Michigan -- two of the states hit hardest by the pandemic -- and rolled out nationwide in the coming weeks. 

Even before the current crisis hit, burnout among nurses has been at an all-time high, with some studies estimating that up to 63 percent of nurses exhibit symptoms such as job-induced stress, anxiety and depression. In addition, nurses are at increased risk of suicide. More than half report being in suboptimal mental or physical health, which research shows can lead to more errors in caring for patients. The COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated this issue, as frontline nurses find themselves delivering care for a high volume of acutely ill patients, often in situations with limited crisis response training or supplies of personal protective equipment (PPE). 

Trusted and The Ohio State University have come together to help address this issue through a partnership that will provide access to wellness support and evidence-based strategies from nursing faculty and advanced practice nursing (APN) students from The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Nurses employed by Trusted who are working in facilities with COVID-19 patients will be able to access an emotional support line staffed by seasoned nurse practitioner faculty, including mental health experts, and supervised students. Those faculty and students will review stressors with callers and offer coping strategies and stress-reduction techniques.

Nurses who call the emotional support line may then opt to participate in a wellness support partnership program supported by the College of Nursing for a period of four or eight weeks. This will include cognitive-behavioral skills building, motivational interviewing, mindfulness and therapeutic communication aimed at finding sustainable solutions to enhance the nurses’ health and well-being, both during the pandemic and for life.

“Our healthcare professionals on the front lines of this pandemic deserve not only our highest regards for their selfless service, but also our support to handle what they are feeling and experiencing because of this crisis,” said Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, APRN-CNP, EBP-C, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer and dean of the College of Nursing at Ohio State. “Our college’s faculty, staff and students participating in this effort are well-versed in evidence-based interventions that will not only help these nurses survive, but thrive and build the resilience needed to continue to provide high-quality care and save lives.”

“As a nurses-first company, Trusted was founded on a simple idea: Nurses are the backbone of our healthcare system, and we must do more to support them,” said Dan Weberg, PhD, RN, head of clinical innovation at Trusted. “The COVID-19 crisis has pushed this issue into the national consciousness, and we are committed to using this moment to advocate for and identify new ways to support the mental well-being of nurses not just on the front lines, but everywhere.” 

Since the onset of COVID-19, Trusted has been focused on meeting the unprecedented demand for healthcare workers by matching nurses who have raised their hands to help with hospitals battling the pandemic. As a nurses-first company, Trusted was among the first to offer guaranteed quarantine pay for all of their nurses, and has made their Nurse Advocate team -- former bedside nurses who offer guidance throughout the job search process -- available 24/7 to support the needs of Trusted nurses working on the front lines. Over the last several weeks, nearly 40,000 nurses have signed up via Trusted to work on the front lines of the crisis. 

About Trusted Health

Trusted is where modern nurses go to build their careers. Nurses are the backbone of our healthcare system and yet their options for finding new roles are cumbersome and outdated. Trusted is on a mission to change this by matching the nurses on our platform with a range of flexible jobs that meet their preferences and career goals. With support from a dedicated Nurse Advocate and unmatched insight into compensation and contract details, Trusted makes it easy for nurses to navigate the job search process and manage their careers with confidence. 

Trusted supports hiring in all 50 states and has connected the nurses on its platform with thousands of opportunities. Based in San Francisco, CA, Trusted has raised $25 million in funding from Craft Ventures, Felicis Ventures, and Founder Collective, as well as healthcare innovators like Texas Medical Center and Healthbox. For more information, visit trustedhealth.com.

About The Ohio State University College of Nursing

The Ohio State University College of Nursing exists to transform health and improve lives through top-tier teaching, research and innovation, grounded in evidence-based practice and a powerful culture and support system to foster optimal personal well-being.

The college’s nationally-ranked academic programs taught by world-class faculty offer top-notch programs for future and current nurses and healthcare leaders. U.S. News & World Report highly ranks our university-wide online bachelor’s including RN to BSN (#1), online master’s (#4), traditional master’s (#6) and online Doctor of Nursing Practice (#8). Majors include both nursing and programs in healthcare and wellness innovation, along with certificates that range from school nurse and primary care to nurse education and nurse/health coaching.

The college’s two research centers – the Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children and Youth and the Center for Healthy Aging, Self-Management and Complex Care – seek innovative solutions to real-world healthcare issues. The college received approximately $10.7 million in research awards in FY2019, including $4.3 million in NIH funding – #6 among public institutions and #13 overall. Its Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-based Practice (EBP) in Nursing and Healthcare promotes EBP worldwide and offers the first globally-recognized certificate of added qualification in EBP.

March 13, 2020

The current situation with the coronavirus, otherwise known as COVID-19, can be a source of stress and anxiety for you as well as your children. The most important thing that you can do to help your children through this uncertain time is to remain calm when you are with your children as your own level of anxiety will affect them. If your children sense you are anxious, they will be anxious as well. Reducing your own stress and anxiety so that you are less anxious will help your children to stay calm.

October 21, 2020 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
October 21-23, 2020

In 2018 The Ohio State University presented the first national summit series to address the state of mental and physical well-being among healthcare providers and health professions students.

Healthcare providers across the nation are experiencing high rates of burnout, depression and unhealthy lifestyle behaviors. Research indicates that the state of their mental and physical well-being affects quality and safety of patient outcomes associated with healthcare delivery. As a result of this public health issue, the National Academy of Medicine has launched an action collaborative on clinician well-being and resilience.

Clinician well-being supports improved patient-clinician relationships, a high-functioning care team, and an engaged and effective workforce. When we invest in clinician well-being, everyone wins.

Learn more

November 15, 2019
Honor recognizes college’s leadership in preventing heart disease and stroke

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The National Forum for Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention honored The Ohio State University College of Nursing with the 2019 Heart Healthy Stroke Free award to recognize the college’s exceptional leadership and collaboration to carry out the national Public Health Action Plan to Prevent Heart Disease and Stroke.

The College of Nursing received this award at The National Forum’s 2019 annual meeting, Catalyst for Collaboration, on October 30 in Washington D.C. The meeting convened 100 thought leaders from more than 60 public, private and nonprofit organizations. Each year at the annual meeting, the National Forum recognizes individuals and organizations who have made exceptional contributions to heart disease and stroke prevention.

“Our college is deeply committed to preventing heart attacks and strokes at Ohio State, in our community and state, and throughout the nation,” said Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer and dean of the College of Nursing. “The partnership that we now have with more than 170 organizations, including universities, public health departments and community agencies who are using our free online Million Hearts® modules, has resulted in over 75,000 people across the U.S. being screened and educated on evidence-based strategies to prevent cardiovascular disease.”

The National Forum for Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention focuses on implementing  strategies to prevent heart disease and stroke with a goal to eliminate cardiovascular health disparities and achieve health equity. The organization strives to lead and encourage collaborative action among stakeholders committed to heart disease and stroke prevention.

Ohio State and the National Forum recently partnered with the Ohio Mayors Alliance to champion heart health at the Buckeyes’ football game against Maryland on November 9 at Ohio Stadium. The effort included information sharing in the game program, on the scoreboard and on a new website supported by the Office of the Chief Wellness Officer with facts and resources to help people live healthier lives.

October 09, 2019
C. Everett Koop Award recognizes outstanding worksite wellness programs

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Ohio State University was honored with a national C. Everett Koop Award honorable mention for the breadth and effectiveness of its health and wellness initiatives.

The Koop Awards, which are granted by the Health Project, recognize worksite health promotion and improvement programs with documented results, both in effectiveness and economic impact. Criteria include improving population health by helping people change unhealthy behaviors and reducing health risks, establishing a culture of health and offering good value for the investment in these programs. Ohio State was one of only seven institutions nationally – and the only university – to earn an honorable mention award this year.

The Health Project is a not-for-profit corporation formed to bring about critical attitudinal and behavioral changes in addressing the health and well-being of Americans. Its mission is to seek out, evaluate, promote and disseminate the lessons learned from exemplary health promotion and disease prevention programs with demonstrated effectiveness in influencing personal health habits and cost-effective use of health care resources.

“This wonderful honor confirms that we are on the right track in promoting health and well-being across Buckeye Nation,” said Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer and dean of the College of Nursing. “We are building great momentum in our efforts to make Ohio State the healthiest campus in the world, and it starts with creating a wellness culture and incorporating evidence-based programs that get results.”

As the National Academy of Medicine highlighted in its groundbreaking case study released this summer about Ohio State’s efforts around well-being, Ohio State calculates a cumulative productivity net savings of more than $15 million from wellness programming, as well as a $3.65 return on investment for every dollar invested in wellness. Additional impacts include improvements in cardiovascular health; decreases in pre-diabetes, depression and anxiety; and increases in healthy lifestyle behaviors and academics among students, faculty and staff.

Melnyk and Megan Amaya, PhD, director of health promotion and wellness at the College of Nursing, accepted the award on Ohio State’s behalf at the 2019 HERO Forum hosted by the Health Enhancement Research Organization in Portland, Oregon.

July 31, 2019

Many of the 20 million new students starting college this fall will have to manage their health and well-being on their own for the first time. As families review materials related to classes, meals and housing, The Ohio State University Chief Wellness Officer and The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have created a wellness checklist to help students develop a plan to maintain their well-being.

July 31, 2019

The National Academy of Medicine (NAM) has spotlighted The Ohio State University's efforts to reduce the growing concern of burnout among practicing clinicians and medical, nursing, and health sciences students and trainees.

Ohio State became the first university to be featured by NAM as a role model in wellness and prevention, per College of Nursing spokesperson Phil Saken.

July 31, 2019

The National Academy of Medicine’s (NAM) Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-Being and Resilience released a comprehensive and groundbreaking case study today about how The Ohio State University is working to stem the growing epidemic of clinician burnout in healthcare settings.

August 06, 2018

Solutions to combat chronic disease – America’s No. 1 cause of death, disability and rising healthcare costs – will be the focus of a free webinar discussion on March 24.

Sponsored in part by The Ohio State University, the webinar will focus on evidence-based approaches for preventing and managing chronic conditions and how academic institutions can implement these best practices on campus and throughout their communities. Additional sponsors include the National Consortium for Building Healthy Academic Communities (BHAC) and the Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease.

“The health of our country is in crisis,” said panelist and Ohio State's Chief Wellness Officer and Dean of the College of Nursing Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, CPNP/PMHNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN. Melnyk is also founder and president of the National Consortium, an organization that shares its best practices to improve health and wellness outcomes across campuses nationwide. “With the alarming increases in obesity, chronic illness and mental health disorders, it is imperative that higher education institutions place high priority on wellness initiatives and prevention with a sense of urgency,” said Melnyk.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), cardiovascular disease accounts for nearly 600,000 American deaths each year (one in four). An estimated one in three will have diabetes by 2050, and more than 75 cents of every U.S. dollar spent on healthcare is used to treat chronic disease. Melnyk also noted that one in four people suffers from some sort of mental health disorder, yet less than 25 percent receive treatment.

While cardiovascular disease is a popular topic of conversation, this particular webinar discussion will specifically address the value of screening and educating the public.

“What many don’t realize is that several of these conditions can be prevented and effectively managed through simple, healthy lifestyle changes,” explained Melnyk. “With 33 million people teaching, working, learning and living on college campuses in the U.S., academia has an incredible opportunity to influence national health policy and practices and ultimately help build a healthier nation.”


Building Health Academic Communities across the U.S. to Prevent and Manage Chronic Conditions: A Webinar Discussion

Tuesday, March 24, 2015 | 1-3 p.m.
Registration is free.

 

Panelists:

April 05, 2018

POSTPONED: New date will be announced soon!

Ohio State faculty, staff, students, central Ohio first responders and anyone who wants to participate in a great workout in the famed Ohio Stadium are invited to participate in the second annual ROTC Wellness Boot Camp in the Shoe on Monday April 16 from 3:30-6:30 p.m. This unique fitness competition hosted by Buckeye Wellness and the Ohio State ROTC will provide you and your team of up to six people with a great boot camp-style workout. Registration is free! Details and a link to the registration form is available on the webpage.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Teams should plan to arrive 30 minutes prior to their start time.

3:30 p.m.

Onsite team registration begins

3:50 p.m.

Welcome from Ohio State Vice President for Health Promotion and Chief Wellness Officer Bernadette Melnyk 

4-6:30 p.m.

Teams participate in boot camp time slot.