June 05, 2020

A continuing NIH T32 training grant awarded to The Ohio State University College of Nursing from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research (NIH/NINR) will support the training of pre-doctoral students studying health development across the life course. PhD students in nursing will conduct research while working closely with 24 faculty from nursing, sociology, emergency medicine and pediatric medicine. Each year for the next five years, two or three newly admitted nursing PhD students will be supported over two or three years. Our first trainees will start in the 2020–2021 academic year. This novel training program has four goals to address fundamental challenges in nursing research today:

  • recruit and retain diverse and qualified pre-doctoral trainees to conduct rigorous research in the science of health development
  • prepare trainees to develop and implement ethical health research in the science of health development
  • provide scientific grounding and research experiences with highly qualified faculty and using extensively available resources to prepare trainees for research careers
  • increase the number and strengthen the scientific foundation of early career nurse scientists

Central to the training plan is the broadening of our PhD program focus on health determinants, incorporating a modification of the ecodevelopmental and life course model. In light of how health develops across the life course, the research community is challenged to stimulate new research, to develop creative solutions for improving health and wellness and to translate research findings into social policy that will optimize health. This renewal includes attention to sensitive periods of health development from preconception to old age. Trainees will be prepared to lead research teams based upon a life course health development framework that considers the intersection of determinants of health with human biological, psychological, and epigenetic processes, and explains the mechanisms and wellness outcomes of this interaction. The program will further NINR’s goal to support research on the science of health and wellness, which is integral to NINR’s mission as well as across the NIH and the entire federal government, all of whom have recognized that improving health and well-being is critical to reducing the burden of illness now and in the future.

Co-Directors: Rita Pickler, PhD, RN, FAAN and Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN

Class of 2020–2021 trainees (advisors): Nicole Cistone (Pickler, Fortney), Emika Miller (Happ), Lindsay Smith (Harrison)      

The first T32 was funded in 2013. Nine trainees have or will complete the program: Lisa Blair (2018), Colleen McGovern (2018), Randi Bates (2019), Marliese Nist (2019), Elizabeth Hutson (2020), Emma Schlegel, Alexandra Nowak, Stephanie Sealschott, and Laura Beth Kalvas.

Application for The Nursing PhD program for fall 2021 will open in August 2020. The deadline for the submission of all application materials is January 4, 2021. To learn more about our PhD program, please visit our website.

May 14, 2020

New five-year, $2.8 million grant to study nurses’ workload in relation to NICU patient safety

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Heather Tubbs Cooley, PhD, RN, FAAN at The Ohio State University College of Nursing's Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children and Youth is the Principal Investigator (PI) for a $2.8 million R01 grant funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

This R01 will fund the study, “Enhancing Nursing Care Reliability in Neonatal Intensive Care Units.” Co-investigators include the College of Nursing’s Rita Pickler, PhD, RN, FAAN; Thomas Bartman, MD, PhD, from Nationwide Children’s Hospital and other co-investigators from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Johns Hopkins University, and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Tubbs Cooley and her team discovered that NICU nurses regularly miss essential care linked to neonatal safety outcomes due to their everyday workloads. With this grant, the team will now replicate this work in a larger and more heterogeneous sample of units, nurses and patients to assess strategies for workload monitoring in this patient population.

“Beyond staffing ratios and infant acuity measures, subjective workload showed the strongest correlation to care reliability,” said Tubbs Cooley. “The goal of our study is to monitor nurse workload and broaden our current understanding of its effects on care reliability.”

The team will enroll up to 210 nurses in five NICUs to report on workload and care reliability for nearly 820 infants over 1,120 shifts.

They will evaluate differential effects of objective and subjective nurse workload on care reliability in NICUs and examine relationships between shift-level factors and nurses’ subjective workload ratings. The validity of aggregating nurses’ subjective workload ratings within a shift to inform real-time measurement strategies will also be evaluated.

Tubbs Cooley and her team hope their research will lead to a better understanding of NICU nurse workloads. If they are successful, they will leverage the knowledge to improve the safety and care of NICU patients by advancing workload measurement, monitoring and intervention.

April 07, 2020
MNRS virtual conference provides spotlight for exceptional science

Several College of Nursing faculty were honored at the 2020 Midwestern Nursing Research Society’s (MNRS) 44th Annual Research Conference last week. Rather than cancel because of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, MNRS decided to host a virtual conference with the theme of “Advancing Nursing Research with Diverse Populations.”

MNRS explained on its website that “the science needs to be shared, student work needs to be fostered, and nursing researchers need a place to share ideas, innovations, and methodologies. We must be flexible while acknowledging this global health issue.”

“The science was exceptional, presented by researchers and scholars at all levels –students, junior investigators, mid-career and senior scientists,” said Cindy Anderson, PhD, APRN-CNP, ANEF, FAHA, FNAP, FAAN, senior associate dean of academic affairs and educational innovation and professor in the College of Nursing who also serves as president of MNRS. “It was a fitting celebration of the World Health Organization’s Year of the Nurse and Midwife, highlighting the significance of nursing research to the health of our nation and our world.”

 

Pickler receives Lifetime Achievement Award
October 09, 2017

Faculty Rita H. Pickler, PhD, RN, FAAN, has been appointed to the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research at the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR).

 

Pickler is the FloAnn Sours Easton Professor of Child and Adolescent Health and director of the PhD and MS in Nursing Science Programs at The Ohio State University College of Nursing.

 

The advisory council meets three times a year to provide recommendations on the direction and support of the research that forms the evidence base for nursing practice. An important role of the council is to conduct the second-level review of grant applications that have previously been reviewed for scientific merit. In addition, the council reviews the institute's extramural programs and makes recommendations about its intramural research activities.

 

Pickler’s research focuses on the care of the preterm infant with a particular focus on improving neurodevelopmental outcomes. She also studies mechanisms underlying preterm birth, interventions to reduce preterm delivery and infant mortality and transitions to home for families of preterm infants.

 

Pickler has served on numerous National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study sections; she recently completed a term as chair of the Nursing Research Review Committee. Pickler is an editor of the Journal of Advanced Nursing and editor of the research methods column of the Journal of Pediatric Health Care.

 

Members of the council are drawn from the scientific and lay communities, embodying a diverse perspective from the fields of nursing, public and health policy, law and economics. NINR, a component of NIH, is the primary federal agency for the support of nursing research.

 

October 09, 2017

Rita Pickler, PhD, RN, FAAN, has been appointed the editor-in-chief of Nursing Research, the official journal of the Eastern Nursing Research Society (ENRS) and the Western Institute of Nursing (WIN). Pickler is the FloAnn Sours Easton Endowed Professor of Child and Adolescent Health and director of the PhD program at the College of Nursing. The January/February 2018 issue of Nursing Research will be the first of her tenure as editor-in-chief. Read more.