February 20, 2019
Rita and Alex Hillman Foundation funds pilot of first-of-its-kind program targeting well care for pet owners and pets

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Both human and animal patients stand to benefit from an innovative new model of healthcare launched today by leaders of The Ohio State University Colleges of Nursing, Veterinary Medicine and Social Work.

The POP (Pet Owner and Pet) Care pilot program is funded through a Rita and Alex Hillman Foundation Emergent Innovations grant. It joins the knowledge and service of three academic colleges to transition a pattern of reactive sick care into proactive, holistic well care for homebound adults with multiple chronic conditions and their pets.

“As a pet owner and mother of a future veterinarian, this project is near and dear to my heart,” said Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer and dean of the College of Nursing, who is the creator and principal investigator for this grant. “When we talk about transforming health and transforming lives, this innovative strategy is the type of creativity so needed in today’s healthcare system. This collaborative partnership among our health sciences colleges has great potential to change the face of well care, not only for the population of people and pets in our own community, but also to serve as a national model for the country to emulate.”

The POP Care program borrows from the “One Health” concept endorsed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which suggests that the health of people can be directly connected to the health of the animals and environment around them. The program creates a nurse practitioner-led, inter-professional team of a nurse practitioner, veterinarian, and social worker to address the health needs of people and their pets, with the goal of improving health outcomes for both.

“We know from research that the human-animal bond – especially for our older neighbors who live by themselves – is beneficial to both parties’ well-being,” said Laurie Millward, DVM, MS, DACVP, assistant professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine who also leads outreach efforts for the college. “It’s true that when you improve care for a pet, you also improve outcomes for the humans who love them.”

Participating students and faculty from the College of Social Work will assess social determinants of health, including access to nutritious food, transportation, and opportunities to connect to other socially in order to connect patients to resources that can help address those needs.

“This program can change the way we educate students and care for underserved populations in our communities,” said Holly Dabelko-Schoeny, PhD, associate professor in College of Social Work, whose research and expertise include testing innovative interventions to support the well-being of older adults. “We are very excited about learning how both students and patients benefit from this experience so that this approach can be scaled more broadly.”

This interdisciplinary approach will engage students and supervising faculty from each of the three participating colleges. Students will be assigned individual patients to visit at the patients’ homes and provide home care once a week for four weeks. Approximately 60 students from the Colleges of Nursing, Veterinary Medicine and Social Work will be engaged to assess 60 households during this pilot program. A final data analysis based on surveys and health outcomes is expected in December of this year.

February 14, 2019
College ranks #13 among all nursing colleges, #6 among public institutions

COLUMBUS, OHIO – The Ohio State University College of Nursing has made a significant leap in National Institutes of Health (NIH) ranking, placing it among the top 15 nursing colleges in the country. NIH rankings released this week show the College of Nursing at #13 overall and #6 among public institutions, with approximately $4.3 million in NIH research funding.

The College of Nursing ranked #20 last year and #31 two years ago.

“The NIH’s continued and increasing investment in our research at the College of Nursing demonstrates the outstanding quality of our research leadership, faculty and the staff who support them,” said Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, chief wellness officer and dean of the College of Nursing. “We are dreaming, discovering and delivering a healthier world with our faculty’s innovative and cutting-edge research that is truly transforming care and improving lives in real-world settings. I am deeply inspired by their work.”

“Our researchers are incredibly dedicated and passionate in their pursuit of science to prevent or relieve suffering, improve illness recovery, and help people live healthier lives,” said Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, associate dean for research and innovation at the College of Nursing. “It is not only rewarding to receive this level of investment from the NIH, but it is also motivating for us to keep exploring what we are capable of delivering to improve health and well-being across the life-span.”

College of Nursing research newly funded by the NIH this year includes:

 

Interdisciplinary study of Alzheimer’s patients

A five-year grant from NIH and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) is funding the study, “Sex Differences in Pain Reports and Brain Activation in Older Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease.” The grant was awarded to Todd Monroe, PhD, RN-BC, FNAP, FGSA, FAAN, associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Monroe’s interdisciplinary team includes faculty from the College of Nursing, the Departments of Neurology and Geriatrics, and the Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging at Ohio State, as well as collaborators from Vanderbilt University. The study is examining gender and Alzheimer’s-related differences in verbal pain reporting patterns and how they are displayed in regional and network brain function, with an aim to lead to better pain management.

 

Improving the health and well-being of older adults

A five-year grant from NIH and NIA is funding the interdisciplinary study, “Impact of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Oral Therapy on Healing of Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers in Older Adults.” The grant was awarded to Jodi McDaniel, PhD, RN, who is an associate professor and the graduate studies committee chair at The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Co-investigators include Alai Tan, MD, PhD, of the College of Nursing, and College of Medicine faculty Guibin Li, MD, PhD, Narasimham Parinandi, PhD, and Sashwati Roy, PhD. This project is testing a new oral nutrient therapy, and the project’s findings are expected to advance wound healing science.

 

Caring for infants with Down Syndrome and congenital heart disease

Tondi Harrison, PhD, RN, FAAN received an award to fund an administrative supplement to the study, “Behavioral and physiological responses to oral feeding in infants with complex congenital heart disease.” The supplement, from NIH’s INCLUDE program (INvestigation of Co-occurring conditions across the Lifespan to Understand Down SyndromE), will support the addition of infants who have both Down syndrome and congenital heart disease to the study. Harrison is an associate professor in the College of Nursing.

 

Helping pregnant women at-risk for complications

A three-year career development grant was awarded to Shannon Gillespie, PhD, RN, assistant professor, Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children & Youth. Her study, “Maternal Immune Responsiveness as Clinical Target for Preterm Birth Prevention” (The MIRACL Study) is testing a novel method of identifying women at risk for inflammatory preterm birth and determining whether specific preventive interventions are likely to offer benefit during the pregnancy.

 

Examining the role of fathers in birth outcomes

A grant entitled “Paternal Role in Adverse Birth Outcomes in Black Families” is a multi-university project awarded to: Carmen Giurgescu, PhD, RN, WHNP, associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing; Cleopatra Caldwell, PhD, of University of Michigan; and Dawn Phillips Misra, PhD, at Wayne State University. The study aims to add another dimension to efforts to reduce racial disparities in successful birth outcomes.

 

The College of Nursing is currently hiring new faculty who are committed to transforming health and transforming lives. You can find job openings in the college here.

December 05, 2018

A parent’s exposure to dirty air before conception might spell heart trouble for the next generation, a new animal study suggests.

June 03, 2019 8:00 am - June 06, 2019 5:00 pm

Back by popular demand

June 3-4, 2019: Systematic Review Workshop
Speaker/Presenter

Dónal O’Mathúna, PhD, is Associate Professor in the College of Nursing at The Ohio State University and in the School of Nursing & Human Sciences, Dublin City University, Ireland. For 20 years, he has been actively involved as a systematic reviewer in the Cochrane Collaboration. He was the director of Cochrane Ireland from 2014 to 2017, where he developed and conducted systematic review training. He has authored six Cochrane reviews and published articles on evidence-based practice.

This two-day training course will cover systematic review methodologies and critical appraisal skills. The course is suitable for individuals working in the health and social science areas who are considering or planning to conduct a systematic review of intervention studies. No experience in conducting systematic reviews is required. The course will examine the key components of systematic reviews using the Cochrane Collaboration methodology. The course will include lecture, group discussion, and practical exercises.

Expected Outcomes

Explain the essential steps of planning and preparing a systematic review of intervention studies Know how to formulate a review question relevant to their own interests Understand the key principles of literature searching, data extraction, and critical appraisal of studies for a systematic review.

Topics Covered

Introduction to systematic reviews and the Cochrane Collaboration Developing a PICO question for a systematic review of intervention studies Search strategies for studies Assessing study eligibility Critical appraisal of studies Data extraction Introduction to meta-analysis and forest plots Finding resources for systematic reviews

  • Identify the basic principles of meta-analysis
June 5-6, 2019: Research Intensive Workshop

Why intervention research?

Intervention research and comparative effectiveness research are now a high priority for many funding agencies. Researchers are encouraged to develop innovative interventions, including treatment regimens, prevention strategies, and innovative service delivery approaches, and personalize them for optimal use in diverse populations.

In this workshop, the essential elements of designing, conducting, analyzing, and funding intervention research will be taught in a user-friendly format. The workshop is geared toward doctorally prepared nurses, advanced practice nurses, doctoral students and other interdisciplinary health and science professionals.

Lecture topics
  • Using theory to guide intervention research
  • Designing intervention studies
  • Minimizing threats to validity
  • Measurement in intervention research
  • Designing and maintain fidelity in intervention research
  • Sample, missing data, and data management
  • Explaining mediator and moderator effects on intervention outcomes
  • Strategies for successful grant writing, with an emphasis on federal applications (NIH, AHRQ, PCORI)

RIW is now a two-day conference

The Ohio State University
Helene Fuld Institute for EBP
760 Kinnear Road, Columbus, OH 43212
First floor of the BMI Credit Union Building

Registration and Cost

June 3-4, 2019: Systematic Review
$775

June 5-6, 2019: Research Intensive Workshop
$895

SPECIAL - 2 for 1 deal

Register Today

The cost of the workshop will cover light breakfast offerings, lunch, workshop materials on a USB drive, parting gifts, and a copy of “Intervention Research: Designing, Conducting, Analyzing, and Funding."

Registration is limited for maximum participation benefit, so early registration is strongly encouraged.

Registration closes May 20, 2019

You must be ready to pay by credit card at the time of registration. We cannot accept credit card payment by phone or email.

Agenda

Systematic Review

Coming soon!

Research Intensive Workshop

Part 1: Day One

8:00 – 8:30 a.m.

Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:30 am – 8:45 a.m.

Welcome and Introductions
Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN

8:45 – 11:00 a.m.

Designing Intervention Studies
Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN

11:00 – 11:15 a.m.

Recovery Break

11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Using Theory to Guide Intervention Research
Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FAAN

12:00 –1:00 p.m.

Lunch - 2nd floor, room 214

1:00 – 2:15 p.m.

Minimizing Threats to Internal Validity
Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN

2:15 – 2:30 p.m.

Recovery Break

2:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Minimizing Threats to External Validity
Sharon Tucker, PhD, RN, FAAN

3:30 – 4:30 p.m.

Group Interactive Breakout Sessions
Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN
Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FAAN
Sharon Tucker, PhD, RN, FAAN

Part 1: Day Two

8:00 – 8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

8:30 – 9:30 a.m.

Measurement in Intervention Research
Sharon Tucker, PhD, RN, FAAN

9:30 – 10:30 a.m.

Designing and Maintaining Fidelity of Behavioral Intervention
Judith Tate, PhD, RN

10:30 – 10:45 a.m.

Recovery Break

10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Developing Your Grant Budget
Loren Wold, PhD, FAHA, FAPS

12:00 – 12:45 p.m.

Lunch - 2nd floor, room 214

1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Strategies for Successful Grant Writing
Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN

3:00 – 3:45 p.m.

Group Interactive Breakout Sessions and Closing
Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FAAN
Barbara Jones Warren, PhD, RN, PMHCNS-BC, FNAP, FAAN
Loren Wold, PhD, FAHA, FAPS

Travel

Flying

The nearest airport to Ohio State is John Glenn Columbus International Airport (CMH). Taxis are available outside the terminal for ground transportation. John Glenn Columbus International Airport is about 15 minutes from downtown and about 30 minutes from Dublin. 

To view a list of cities that have non-stop flights to Columbus, click here.

Lodging

SpringHill Suites by Marriott
1421 Olentangy Rive Road
Columbus, OH 43212

A block of rooms have been reserved at the SpringHill Suites by Marriott for $132 per night starting the night before the workshop.

Guests may call 1-888-236-2427 and ask for the rate code: RIWC or Book your group rate for RIW.

Transportation

A shuttle will be provided to and from the conference and hotel

Continuing Education Credits

This conference is pending review and will be offering continuing education credits.

Questions?

Kenzie Palsgrove at 614-292-5975 or palsgrove.11@osu.edu
Kristen Bailey at 614-688-1175 or bailey.1386@osu.edu

October 29, 2018

With the goal of improving the health of women and infants, The Ohio State University College of Nursing partnered with the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) in collaboration with ITN productions to produce a video as part of AWHONN’s Partners in Care program. The video addresses research to improve screening techniques to detect depression and anxiety in pregnant and postpartum women.

AWHONN’s Partners in Care program highlights the commitment of the AWHONN community to spread knowledge in working towards solutions on the most critical health issues facing women and newborns.

Faculty within the College of Nursing’s Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children and Youth are conducting vital research to improve the mental health of pregnant and postpartum women, especially in vulnerable populations. “Up to 50 percent of women experience prenatal depression or anxiety,” according to Bernadette Melnyk, Ohio State’s Chief Wellness Officer, Dean of the College of Nursing and Executive Director for the Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare. “Women receive prenatal care, but so often providers do not screen for depression and anxiety.”

Check out the video below to learn more about the college’s research and its real world impacts.

October 19, 2018

This fall, The Ohio State University College of Nursing received a total of over $9 million in new grant funding for research from a variety of prestigious institutions, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the American Cancer Society, the Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation, the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, and others.

“Three of these awards are particularly significant as the proposed studies are part of exciting and important interdisciplinary work led by College of Nursing faculty who are early stage investigators, which means that they are receiving their first R01 or equivalent research grant. The future looks bright for nursing and transdisciplinary science in our college,” stated Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, associate dean for research and innovation inThe Ohio State University College of Nursing.

NIH funds College of Nursing research

The National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research (NIH/NINR) awarded a $191 K grant to Tondi Harrison, PhD, RN,FAAN, (PI) to fund an administrative supplement to the study, “Behavioral and physiological responses to oral feeding in infants with complex congenital heart disease.” The supplement, from NIH’s INCLUDE program (INvestigation of Co-occurring conditions across the Lifespan to Understand Down SyndromE), will support the addition of infants who have both Down syndrome and congenital heart disease to the study. Harrison is an associate professor in the College of Nursing.

The NIH/NINR also awarded a $423 K, three-year career development grant to Shannon Gillespie, PhD, RN, assistant professor, Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children & Youth. Her study, “Maternal Immune Responsiveness as Clinical Target for Preterm Birth Prevention” (The MIRACL Study) will test a novel method of identifying women at risk for inflammatory preterm birth and determining whether specific preventive interventions are likely to offer benefit during the pregnancy.

Recent grants from the NIH also include a $3.3 million NIH/NIA R01 to Todd Monroe, PhD, RN-BC, FNAP, FGSA, FAAN, (PI); a $2.8 million NIH/NIA R01 to Jodi McDaniel, PhD, RN, (PI) and colleagues, and a $1.8 million NIH/NINR R01 to Carmen Giurgescu, PhD, RN, WHNP, and colleagues at Wayne State University.

“All of our new NIH funding provides evidence of the fantastic cutting-edge research being conducted by our nationally renowned faculty and the terrific research infrastructure that is provided by our college so that our faculty can achieve their dreams and produce major positive impact through their work,” stated Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer and dean and professor in the College of Nursing.

Other prestigious institutions support College of Nursing research

The American Cancer Society awarded a five-year, $1.7 million grant to Jennifer Kue, PhD, for the Intergenerational Refugee and Immigrant Cancer Screening Project.

The National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners awarded a foundation grant to Assistant Professor Lisa Kinsella Militello, PhD, MPH, RN, CPNP, to fund the study, “A Solution-Focused Approach: What Low-Income Parents with Young Children Need from Stress-Regulation Smartphone Apps.” IT Project Scientist Emre Sezgin, PhD, of Nationwide Children’s Hospital is a co-investigator on the project.

The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation awarded a grant to Pam Lusk, DNP, RN, FAANP, clinical associate professor, for the study, “Integrating Adolescent Substance Abuse Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) throughout Social Work and Nursing Education.”

The Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation awarded grants to  Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, (PI) and colleagues and  Laureen Smith, PhD, RN, FAAN, (PI) and colleagues.

September 18, 2018

The National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research (NIH/NINR) has awarded a $1.8 million R01 grant to fund the study titled, “Paternal Role in Adverse Birth Outcomes in Black Families.” The multiple-PI grant was awarded to Carmen Giurgescu, PhD, RN, WHNP, associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing, Cleopatra Caldwell, PhD, of University of Michigan and Dawn Phillips Misra, PhD, at Wayne State University. The study was funded from September, 2018 to June, 2022.

 

 According to the PIs, “the few studies that have explored paternal effects on birth outcomes have generally excluded understanding the dynamic, complex, and often correlated maternal-paternal relationship…studies often have been limited to an examination of paternal age, occupation, or socioeconomic status. The proposed study will assess whether and how fathers may have an impact on successful birth outcomes.”

 

“Black women are more likely to have adverse birth outcomes such as preterm birth and low birthweight infants compared with White women,” said Giurgescu. “Although the literature has identified a number of risk factors for adverse birth outcomes associated with mothers, little attention has been given to understanding the role of fathers on birth outcomes. Our study will consider the role of social determinants of health, specifically disadvantaged neighborhoods and experiences of racial discrimination for expectant fathers, and their influences on expectant parents’ mental health and birth outcomes among Black families. We will also measure maternal and paternal telomere length, a biological indicator of chronic stress, and its relationship to adverse birth outcomes.” 

The study aims to add another dimension to efforts to reduce racial disparities. “This information can serve as the foundation for recommendations aimed at family-centered interventions to reduce adverse birth outcomes," Giurgescu stated.    

September 17, 2018

The National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging (NIH/NIA) has awarded a five-year, $3.3 million R01 grant to fund the study titled, “Sex Differences in Pain Reports and Brain Activation in Older Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease.” The grant was awarded to Todd Monroe, PhD, RN-BC, FNAP, FGSA, FAAN, (PI) associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing.

Monroe’s interdisciplinary team will include faculty from the College of Nursing, the Departments of Neurology and Geriatrics, and the Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging at Ohio State, as well as collaborators from Vanderbilt University.

“Older adults with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are at risk of having their pain undertreated. We do know that healthy males and females experience pain differently. It is not known if these sex-differences extend into the AD population. This study will provide research focused on better management of pain in people with AD,” Monroe stated in the proposal. “Poorly treated pain in older adults with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a critical public health problem and understanding sex and AD-related differences in pain function is an NIA priority area.”

The proposal stated that when compared to healthy adults, and in the presence of similarly known painful conditions, older adults with AD receive less pain medication. Reasons for this discrepancy are poorly understood. Meanwhile, inadequately treated pain negatively impacts quality of life and increases health care costs.

The research will examine how verbal pain reporting patterns in responses to acute experimental thermal pain differs between older males and females with and without AD and how these sex-differences map onto regional and network brain functional changes. The study aims to determine whether sensory (stimulus intensity) and affective (stimulus unpleasantness) responses differ by sex in people with and without AD during cutaneous thermal stimulation. Examining baseline differences in experimental thermal pain between males and females with and without AD will provide a foundation for understanding factors that may contribute to untreated pain risk, as well as for developing sex-specific novel assessment, prevention, and treatment strategies in the older population with AD.

August 22, 2018

The Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare has awarded its inaugural round of grants. The grants are intended to provide an opportunity to stimulate and advance evidence-based practice (EBP) and implementation science in nursing and healthcare across the United States. 

The grants were awarded to Linda Quinlin, DNP, APRN-CNS, APRN-CNP, ACHPN, and Kerry A. Milner, DNCs, RN, for EBP and research projects, respectively.

Quinlin was awarded the EBP grant for “Quality Improvement Project: Incorporating Evidence Based Practice into the Nursing Culture at Ohio’s Hospice Inc.” The purpose of her project is to incorporate EBP into the nursing culture at Ohio’s Hospice Incorporated (OHI). Implementing EBP will involve a systematic culture change within OHI. 

The funding from the grant will be applied to professionally recording a presentation, “Questioning Common Clinical Practices: What does the Evidence Show? A Primer to EBP,” to educate OHI nurses onsite and online about how to begin their journeys with EBP and put science into practice.

Other interventions will be implemented to enrich nurses’ knowledge leading up to OHI Poster Day 2018, a celebration of EBP. This interdisciplinary event is designed to inspire excellence in innovation, research and EBP. The celebration will begin with an EBP presentation by a local nurse researcher and be followed by a poster display of EBP projects completed by OHI nurses.

Milner was awarded the research grant for “Visitation Practices in Magnet and Pathway to Excellence Facilities with Adult Intensive Care Units.” This study aims to answer the questions “What are the visitation policies in adult ICUs in Magnet and Pathway to Excellence designated healthcare facilities?” and “What are the methods for implementation and sustainment of open visitation in these facilities?”

The study stems from the conflict of restrictive visitor policies in adult ICUs, which continue to be the norm across the U.S. Milner hopes to alleviate the lack of research surrounding methods for implementing and sustaining open-visitation policies.

The study will use cross-sectional, sequential and mixed-method survey designs to identify facilities with open-visitation adult ICUs, survey program directors of eligible facilities about methods of implementation and lay the foundation for future studies on the impact of open visitation policies on patient and family outcomes. 

Nursing and social work students will be engaged in all aspects of the research under investigator mentorship.

All grant proposals were reviewed by a committee chaired by Sharon Tucker, PhD, RN, FAAN, with members Kirsten M. Hanrahan, ARNP, DNP; Richard Ricciardi, PhD, NP, FAANP, FAAN; Sheila C. Sullivan, PhD, RN; Elisa Jang, RN; Sonia A. Duffy, PhD, RN, FAAN; Beth A. Vottero, PhD, RN, CNE; and Ruth Labardee, DNP, RN, CNL, NEA-BC. 

https://fuld.nursing.osu.edu

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