June 20, 2020

A team of researchers from Ohio State University’s College of Nursing recently received a $1.6 million federal grant to try to reduce the chances of young, Black adults getting heart disease.

June 05, 2020

A continuing NIH T32 training grant awarded to The Ohio State University College of Nursing from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research (NIH/NINR) will support the training of pre-doctoral students studying health development across the life course. PhD students in nursing will conduct research while working closely with 24 faculty from nursing, sociology, emergency medicine and pediatric medicine. Each year for the next five years, two or three newly admitted nursing PhD students will be supported over two or three years. Our first trainees will start in the 2020–2021 academic year. This novel training program has four goals to address fundamental challenges in nursing research today:

  • recruit and retain diverse and qualified pre-doctoral trainees to conduct rigorous research in the science of health development
  • prepare trainees to develop and implement ethical health research in the science of health development
  • provide scientific grounding and research experiences with highly qualified faculty and using extensively available resources to prepare trainees for research careers
  • increase the number and strengthen the scientific foundation of early career nurse scientists

Central to the training plan is the broadening of our PhD program focus on health determinants, incorporating a modification of the ecodevelopmental and life course model. In light of how health develops across the life course, the research community is challenged to stimulate new research, to develop creative solutions for improving health and wellness and to translate research findings into social policy that will optimize health. This renewal includes attention to sensitive periods of health development from preconception to old age. Trainees will be prepared to lead research teams based upon a life course health development framework that considers the intersection of determinants of health with human biological, psychological, and epigenetic processes, and explains the mechanisms and wellness outcomes of this interaction. The program will further NINR’s goal to support research on the science of health and wellness, which is integral to NINR’s mission as well as across the NIH and the entire federal government, all of whom have recognized that improving health and well-being is critical to reducing the burden of illness now and in the future.

Co-Directors: Rita Pickler, PhD, RN, FAAN and Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN

Class of 2020–2021 trainees (advisors): Nicole Cistone (Pickler, Fortney), Emika Miller (Happ), Lindsay Smith (Harrison)      

The first T32 was funded in 2013. Nine trainees have or will complete the program: Lisa Blair (2018), Colleen McGovern (2018), Randi Bates (2019), Marliese Nist (2019), Elizabeth Hutson (2020), Emma Schlegel, Alexandra Nowak, Stephanie Sealschott, and Laura Beth Kalvas.

Application for The Nursing PhD program for fall 2021 will open in August 2020. The deadline for the submission of all application materials is January 4, 2021. To learn more about our PhD program, please visit our website.

April 07, 2020
MNRS virtual conference provides spotlight for exceptional science

Several College of Nursing faculty were honored at the 2020 Midwestern Nursing Research Society’s (MNRS) 44th Annual Research Conference last week. Rather than cancel because of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, MNRS decided to host a virtual conference with the theme of “Advancing Nursing Research with Diverse Populations.”

MNRS explained on its website that “the science needs to be shared, student work needs to be fostered, and nursing researchers need a place to share ideas, innovations, and methodologies. We must be flexible while acknowledging this global health issue.”

“The science was exceptional, presented by researchers and scholars at all levels –students, junior investigators, mid-career and senior scientists,” said Cindy Anderson, PhD, APRN-CNP, ANEF, FAHA, FNAP, FAAN, senior associate dean of academic affairs and educational innovation and professor in the College of Nursing who also serves as president of MNRS. “It was a fitting celebration of the World Health Organization’s Year of the Nurse and Midwife, highlighting the significance of nursing research to the health of our nation and our world.”

 

Pickler receives Lifetime Achievement Award
March 26, 2020

Microwave ovens produce radio-frequency waves that cause the water molecules in an object to vibrate. This vibration causes friction, which allows the object to heat up to a temperature that can kill germs.

That's why microwaves are sometimes used to disinfect items such as a household sponge, as they are a hotbed for viruses and bacteria.

However, research has found mixed results on whether a microwave can effectively kill germs on a sponge, or even in food. Here's what you need to know.

March 25, 2020

Speech-language experts from The Ohio State University and across the country have teamed up to produce a free online suite of tools and resources for healthcare professionals to utilize in the treatment and care of patients battling COVID-19 who are unable to speak.

Speech-language pathologists, nursing leaders and engineers from the Patient-Provider Communication (PPC) Forum developed the toolkit with support from the U.S. Society of Augmentative and Alternative Communications.

February 12, 2020

College ranks #16 among all nursing colleges, #9 among public institutions

The Ohio State University College of Nursing has strengthened its standing as a top earner of grant funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The Blue Ridge Institute for Medical Research’s new review of NIH grant awards ranks the College of Nursing at #16 overall and #9 among public institutions, with approximately $4.3 million in NIH research funding.

This is the third consecutive year that the College of Nursing has ranked in the nation’s top 20 for primary NIH grant funding. Overall, the college received approximately $10.7 million in research and development grants from external funders, including NIH, in FY2019.

“Our standing as a premier research college is driven by the passion, innovation and dedication of our research leadership, faculty and staff to improve healthcare quality and health outcomes,” said Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer and dean of the College of Nursing. “The NIH’s continued investment in our research helps us transform health and improve lives by dreaming, discovering and delivering a healthier world.”

“The innovative and relevant science that our research faculty conduct is addressing critically-important healthcare problems,” said Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, associate dean for research and innovation at the College of Nursing. “Their work will help improve the health and well-being of people across the life-span.”

This round of NIH funding encompasses both new awards and recurrent years of funding for existing, supported research programs. New awards for the College of Nursing support science in the area of aging, including pain/symptom management and interventions to promote cognitive and functional recovery from critical illness in adults. Those programs include:

Expansion of study on pain differences for Alzheimer’s patients

Karen O. Moss, PhD, RN, CNL, assistant professor at the College of Nursing, received a diversity supplement award in conjunction with a five-year existing NIH/National Institute on Aging (NIA) study entitled “Sex Differences in Pain Reports and Brain Activation in Older Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease.” The grant was awarded to an interdisciplinary team that includes Todd Monroe, PhD, RN-BC, FNAP, FGSA, FAAN, associate professor in College of Nursing, as well as faculty from the College of Nursing, the Departments of Neurology and Geriatrics, the Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging at Ohio State and collaborators from Vanderbilt University. The study is examining gender and Alzheimer’s-related differences in verbal pain reporting patterns and how they are displayed in regional and network brain function, with an aim to lead to better pain management. Moss’ work will focus on how patients of different racial backgrounds self-report pain and the impact of Alzheimer’s on how the brain processes pain, with the long-term goal of developing appropriate interventions.

Advancing science on sensitivity to cancer pain in Alzheimer’s patients

Monroe and his research partner Ronald Cowan, MD, PhD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral health at Vanderbilt University, will lead a multi-site five-year, $5 million NIH/NIA grant project to advance research focused on patients with Alzheimer’s disease and certain types of cancer and their sensitivity to pain. The study, “Pain Sensitivity and Unpleasantness in People with Alzheimer’s Disease and Cancer,” examines whether these patients are at greater risk of suffering from poorly-treated pain at the end of life.

Helping adults needing treatment in intensive-care units

The National Institutes of Health/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NIH/NHLBI) awarded a three-year, $1.2 million grant to Michele Balas, PhD, RN , CCRN-K, FCCM, FAAN, associate professor in the College of Nursing. The study entitled “Determinants of Implementation Success Coordinating Ventilator, Early Ambulation and Rehabilitation Efforts in the ICU (DISCOVER-ICU)” includes collaborators Alai Tan, PhD, (Co-I) and Lorraine Mion, PhD, RN, FAAN, (Co-I) of The Ohio State University College of Nursing, plus collaborators from Vanderbilt University and the Society of Critical Care Medicine. This study advances research into evidence-based interventions – including what is known as the ABCDEF bundle – to improve clinical outcomes in ICU patients.

NIH/NIA also awarded a two-year, $312,000 grant to fund the study, “A Problem Solving Intervention for Post-ICU Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults.” The grant was awarded to Judith Tate, PhD, RN (PI), assistant professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Co-investigators include Lorraine C. Mion, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Alai Tan, PhD, of the College of Nursing, and Jennifer Bogner, PhD, ABPP, FACRM, of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in the College of Medicine. This pilot study focuses on the risks of delirium to brain health in older patients treated in ICUs and tests the impact of a home-based intervention.

NIH-supported research also continues on multi-year grants already awarded to faculty working in the Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children and Youth. That research includes:

  • Tondi Harrison, PhD, RN, FAAN: Examining responses to oral feeding in infants with both Down syndrome and congenital heart disease
  • Shannon Gillespie, PhD, RN: Testing a novel method of identifying women at risk for inflammatory preterm birth and how specific preventive interventions may offer benefit during pregnancy

The College of Nursing is currently hiring new faculty who are committed to transforming health and improving lives. You can find job openings in the college by clicking on this link.

November 07, 2019

Science hasn’t yet caught up with electronic cigarettes, leaving health care providers and users with many unknowns. But a new review of the research so far finds growing evidence that vaping can harm the heart and blood vessels.

October 22, 2019
Program explores keto eating, other interventions and impact on cardiovascular risk for African American women

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation has awarded a one-year, $50,000 Hillman Emergent Innovation Program grant to two research faculty from The Ohio State University College of Nursing for their program, “Keto Prescribed: Translating Ketogenic Research into Clinical Practice.” Sigma Theta Tau International has also awarded the project a $20,000 American Nurses Credentialing Center Evidence-Based Practice Implementation Grant to fund the initial round of participants.

The project’s proposal states that “this nurse practitioner-led health coaching program incorporates ketogenic eating and culturally competent mental/physical health interventions to reduce cardiovascular disease risk and increase quality of life for adult African American women.” Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for women (one out of every three women). Research shows not only a growing prevalence of obesity and diet-related diseases such as diabetes in African American women, but also that there are opportunities for changes in lifestyle behaviors to help improve well-being for African American women, who are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

“We are grateful for the Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation’s and Sigma Theta Tau International's support of a program that we believe will be life-changing for this population of women,” said Barbara Jones Warren, PhD, RN, APRN-CNS, FNAP, FAAN, professor of clinical nursing at the College of Nursing and the principal investigator for this project. “We are taking a holistic approach of combining nutrition under keto principles with other appropriate interventions to transform the health of these women and impact their lives in meaningful ways.”

According to the project proposal, “Keto Prescribed” will create a nurse practitioner-led, interdisciplinary team-based model of care in a community setting. The activities planned through the program include community and online group interactions; physical checks to measure outcomes of areas such as weight, body mass index and blood pressure; and evaluations using surveys to measure progress in participants’ quality of life and the feasibility and acceptability of the dietary intervention.

“I’m so inspired by the potential of this program,” said Audra Hanners, MSN, RN, APRN-CNP. Hanners, an instructor of clinical practice at the College of Nursing, is assisting with this program. “We are working to clear barriers to better health for African American women, and the commitment from the Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation and Sigma Theta Tau International is crucial to this mission.”

According to its website, the Hillman Emergent Innovation Program supports forward-thinking nurses who create “bold, early-stage (pre-evidence or untested) interventions that target health and health care needs for vulnerable populations, including groups that are economically disadvantaged, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBTQ people, the homeless, rural populations and others.”

The mission of Sigma Theta Tau International, which was founded in 1922 at what is now the Indiana University School of Nursing, is "advancing world health and celebrating nursing excellence in scholarship, leadership and service."

People interested in participating in the program can find more information here.

July 24, 2019

It’s possible that a lock of hair could one day aid in the diagnosis of depression and in efforts to monitor the effects of treatment, said the author of a new study examining cortisol levels in the hair of teens.

July 19, 2019
Grants support transformative research in healthcare across the lifespan

The Ohio State University College of Nursing announced today that faculty researchers at the college received approximately $10.7 million in grant funding during fiscal year 2019. That compares to $6.9 million granted for fiscal year 2018.

This level of funding supports research in several critical areas of healthcare, including aging and dementia care, understanding and preventing preterm birth, health and wellness interventions for vulnerable populations, symptom science, and improving critical and chronic care outcomes across the lifespan.

“We are grateful for the support our research faculty continue to receive to advance nursing and health sciences,” said Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FAAN, FGSA, associate dean of research and innovation at the College of Nursing. “Our researchers pursue breakthroughs and provide leadership in priority areas that promote wellness, stunt the impact of chronic disease and improve health across the lifespan.”

The college revealed in February that last year, it ranked #13 overall and #6 among public institutions nationally in National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant funding specifically.

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