May 09, 2019

The National Institutes of Health/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NIH/NHLBI) has awarded a three-year, $1.2 million R01 grant to Michele Balas, PhD, RN , CCRN-K, FCCM, FAAN, associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing. This R01 will fund a research study entitled, “Determinants of Implementation Success Coordinating Ventilator, Early Ambulation and Rehabilitation Efforts in the ICU (DISCOVER-ICU).” Collaborators on the grant include Alai Tan, PhD, (Co-I) and Lorraine Mion, PhD, RN, FAAN, (Co-I) of The Ohio State University College of Nursing; Brenda T. Pun, DNP, RN (Co-I), Eduard E. Vasilevskis, MD, MPH, FHM (Co-I), and E. Wesley Ely, MD, MPH (consultant), of Vanderbilt University; and Lori A. Harmon, RRT, MBA (Co-I), of the Society of Critical Care Medicine.

“This study addresses the need to improve the care and outcomes of the millions of patients admitted to U.S. intensive care units (ICUs) annually,” Balas stated. “Persons experiencing an illness severe enough to require an ICU stay frequently experience profound physical, mental and cognitive health impairments that may persist for months to years after hospital discharge.

“Evidence demonstrates these clinical outcomes improve when integrated, interprofessional, evidence-based approaches to symptom management, mechanical ventilation and physical mobility are applied,” Balas continued. “One such approach, the ABCDEF bundle, has been associated in previous studies with lower ICU and hospital mortality rates, fewer days spent on mechanical ventilation, fewer days spent in physical restraints and lower odds of delirium and coma. Despite these proven benefits, the ABCDEF bundle has yet to be widely adopted in everyday ICU care.”

In the NIH-funded study, Balas and her team will continue their three-year partnership with the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s ICU Liberation Collaborative. The overall objective of the research is to develop multilevel implementation strategies to enhance sustainable adoption of the ABCDEF bundle in routine ICU practice. The team is particularly interested in discovering how various patient-, provider-, and organization-level characteristics and implementation strategies effect ABCDEF bundle adoption.

The results of this work aim to lead directly to the development of implementation strategies that are adaptable, responsive to the needs of the critical care community and accountable for the cultural and organizational factors necessary to increase ABCDEF bundle adoption.

“Our team is thrilled to lead this important line of investigation. We firmly believe that better integration of the evidence-based ABCDEF bundle has the potential to substantially reduce the short- and long-term physical, cognitive and emotional burden critical illness imposes on critically ill adults and their family members.”


Tate awarded NIH/NIA grant

The National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging (NIH/NIA) has awarded a two-year, $312,000 grant to fund the study, “A Problem Solving Intervention for Post-ICU Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults.”

The grant was awarded to Judith Tate, PhD, RN (PI), assistant professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Co-investigators include Lorraine C. Mion, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Alai Tan, PhD, of the College of Nursing, and Jennifer Bogner, PhD, ABPP, FACRM, of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in the College of Medicine. The grant will run from April 15, 2019, to March 31, 2021.

“Older adults comprise more than half of all intensive care unit (ICU) days and are at risk of delirium, a common acute brain impairment associated with increased risk for dementia and altered trajectories of cognitive recovery,” the grant proposal states. “The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and early efficacy of a problem-solving intervention, Post Intensive Care Unit Problem Solving (PIC-UPS) in the home setting for older adult ICU survivors suffering from post-ICU cognitive impairment.”

April 18, 2019

Through a newly awarded $65.9 million federal research grant to address the opioid epidemic, The Ohio State University will lead a consortium of academic, state and community partners that aims to reduce overdose deaths by 40% over three years.

March 22, 2019

On the tombstone of Fannie Lou Hamer, a leader in the Civil Rights Movement who died of complications from hypertension and breast cancer, it says “I am sick and tired of being sick and tired.” Although Mrs. Hamer’s famous quote was in the context of living under the tyranny of the South’s Jim Crow, her sentiments are salient for African American women today. Oddly enough, the twentieth century issues that Fannie Lou Hamer and other civil rights leaders fought and shed their blood for are ever present in the twenty-first century. Issues such as voting rights, job discrimination, and housing continue to impact the quality of life among African American women and in turn affect their health. Today, African American women find themselves in unwanted leadership positions, where they have almost double the rates of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension compared with White women, resulting in higher mortality rates for these women. The persistence of disparity requires reexamining this complex phenomenon. As researchers and scholars, we will need to reframe our questions. We will need to move beyond the pedestrian questions that emanate from a single lens. We will need to challenge ourselves to using multiple lenses simultaneously, with the understanding that African American women are more than negative health statistics. Moreover, we will need to keep in mind that African American women are not monolithic but diverse as pointed out by poet Mona Lake Jones, they are “…Jugglers of profession, managers of lives; Mothers of children, lovers and wives; Good hearted, reaching out to others; Giving back to the community and supporting their brothers; All these sisters struggled through the path they had come….”

February 20, 2019
Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation funds pilot of first-of-its-kind program targeting well care for pet owners and pets

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Both human and animal patients stand to benefit from an innovative new model of healthcare launched today by leaders of The Ohio State University Colleges of Nursing, Veterinary Medicine and Social Work.

The POP (Pet Owner and Pet) Care pilot program is funded through a Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation Emergent Innovation grant. It joins the knowledge and service of three academic colleges to transition a pattern of reactive sick care into proactive, holistic well care for homebound adults with multiple chronic conditions and their pets.

“As a pet owner and mother of a future veterinarian, this project is near and dear to my heart,” said Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer and dean of the College of Nursing, who is the creator and principal investigator for this grant. “When we talk about transforming health and transforming lives, this innovative strategy is the type of creativity so needed in today’s healthcare system. This collaborative partnership among our health sciences colleges has great potential to change the face of well care, not only for the population of people and pets in our own community, but also to serve as a national model for the country to emulate.”

The POP Care program borrows from the “One Health” concept endorsed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which suggests that the health of people can be directly connected to the health of the animals and environment around them. The program creates a nurse practitioner-led, inter-professional team of a nurse practitioner, veterinarian, and social worker to address the health needs of people and their pets, with the goal of improving health outcomes for both.

“We know from research that the human-animal bond – especially for our older neighbors who live by themselves – is beneficial to both parties’ well-being,” said Laurie Millward, DVM, MS, DACVP, assistant professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine who also leads outreach efforts for the college. “It’s true that when you improve care for a pet, you also improve outcomes for the humans who love them.”

Participating students and faculty from the College of Social Work will assess social determinants of health, including access to nutritious food, transportation, and opportunities to connect to other socially in order to connect patients to resources that can help address those needs.

“This program can change the way we educate students and care for underserved populations in our communities,” said Holly Dabelko-Schoeny, PhD, associate professor in College of Social Work, whose research and expertise include testing innovative interventions to support the well-being of older adults. “We are very excited about learning how both students and patients benefit from this experience so that this approach can be scaled more broadly.”

This interdisciplinary approach will engage students and supervising faculty from each of the three participating colleges. Students will be assigned individual patients to visit at the patients’ homes and provide home care once a week for four weeks. Approximately 60 students from the Colleges of Nursing, Veterinary Medicine and Social Work will be engaged to assess 60 households during this pilot program. A final data analysis based on surveys and health outcomes is expected in December of this year.

February 14, 2019
College ranks #13 among all nursing colleges, #6 among public institutions

COLUMBUS, OHIO – The Ohio State University College of Nursing has made a significant leap in National Institutes of Health (NIH) ranking, placing it among the top 15 nursing colleges in the country. NIH rankings released this week show the College of Nursing at #13 overall and #6 among public institutions, with approximately $4.3 million in NIH research funding.

The College of Nursing ranked #20 last year and #31 two years ago.

“The NIH’s continued and increasing investment in our research at the College of Nursing demonstrates the outstanding quality of our research leadership, faculty and the staff who support them,” said Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, chief wellness officer and dean of the College of Nursing. “We are dreaming, discovering and delivering a healthier world with our faculty’s innovative and cutting-edge research that is truly transforming care and improving lives in real-world settings. I am deeply inspired by their work.”

“Our researchers are incredibly dedicated and passionate in their pursuit of science to prevent or relieve suffering, improve illness recovery, and help people live healthier lives,” said Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, associate dean for research and innovation at the College of Nursing. “It is not only rewarding to receive this level of investment from the NIH, but it is also motivating for us to keep exploring what we are capable of delivering to improve health and well-being across the life-span.”

College of Nursing research newly funded by the NIH this year includes:

 

Interdisciplinary study of Alzheimer’s patients

A five-year grant from NIH and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) is funding the study, “Sex Differences in Pain Reports and Brain Activation in Older Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease.” The grant was awarded to Todd Monroe, PhD, RN-BC, FNAP, FGSA, FAAN, associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Monroe’s interdisciplinary team includes faculty from the College of Nursing, the Departments of Neurology and Geriatrics, and the Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging at Ohio State, as well as collaborators from Vanderbilt University. The study is examining gender and Alzheimer’s-related differences in verbal pain reporting patterns and how they are displayed in regional and network brain function, with an aim to lead to better pain management.

 

Improving the health and well-being of older adults

A five-year grant from NIH and NIA is funding the interdisciplinary study, “Impact of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Oral Therapy on Healing of Chronic Venous Leg Ulcers in Older Adults.” The grant was awarded to Jodi McDaniel, PhD, RN, who is an associate professor and the graduate studies committee chair at The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Co-investigators include Alai Tan, MD, PhD, of the College of Nursing, and College of Medicine faculty Guibin Li, MD, PhD, Narasimham Parinandi, PhD, and Sashwati Roy, PhD. This project is testing a new oral nutrient therapy, and the project’s findings are expected to advance wound healing science.

 

Caring for infants with Down Syndrome and congenital heart disease

Tondi Harrison, PhD, RN, FAAN received an award to fund an administrative supplement to the study, “Behavioral and physiological responses to oral feeding in infants with complex congenital heart disease.” The supplement, from NIH’s INCLUDE program (INvestigation of Co-occurring conditions across the Lifespan to Understand Down SyndromE), will support the addition of infants who have both Down syndrome and congenital heart disease to the study. Harrison is an associate professor in the College of Nursing.

 

Helping pregnant women at-risk for complications

A three-year career development grant was awarded to Shannon Gillespie, PhD, RN, assistant professor, Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children & Youth. Her study, “Maternal Immune Responsiveness as Clinical Target for Preterm Birth Prevention” (The MIRACL Study) is testing a novel method of identifying women at risk for inflammatory preterm birth and determining whether specific preventive interventions are likely to offer benefit during the pregnancy.

 

Examining the role of fathers in birth outcomes

A grant entitled “Paternal Role in Adverse Birth Outcomes in Black Families” is a multi-university project awarded to: Carmen Giurgescu, PhD, RN, WHNP, associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing; Cleopatra Caldwell, PhD, of University of Michigan; and Dawn Phillips Misra, PhD, at Wayne State University. The study aims to add another dimension to efforts to reduce racial disparities in successful birth outcomes.

 

The College of Nursing is currently hiring new faculty who are committed to transforming health and transforming lives. You can find job openings in the college here.

December 05, 2018

A parent’s exposure to dirty air before conception might spell heart trouble for the next generation, a new animal study suggests.

October 29, 2018

With the goal of improving the health of women and infants, The Ohio State University College of Nursing partnered with the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) in collaboration with ITN productions to produce a video as part of AWHONN’s Partners in Care program. The video addresses research to improve screening techniques to detect depression and anxiety in pregnant and postpartum women.

AWHONN’s Partners in Care program highlights the commitment of the AWHONN community to spread knowledge in working towards solutions on the most critical health issues facing women and newborns.

Faculty within the College of Nursing’s Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children and Youth are conducting vital research to improve the mental health of pregnant and postpartum women, especially in vulnerable populations. “Up to 50 percent of women experience prenatal depression or anxiety,” according to Bernadette Melnyk, Ohio State’s Chief Wellness Officer, Dean of the College of Nursing and Executive Director for the Helene Fuld Health Trust National Institute for Evidence-based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare. “Women receive prenatal care, but so often providers do not screen for depression and anxiety.”

Check out the video below to learn more about the college’s research and its real world impacts.

October 19, 2018

This fall, The Ohio State University College of Nursing received a total of over $9 million in new grant funding for research from a variety of prestigious institutions, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the American Cancer Society, the Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation, the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, and others.

“Three of these awards are particularly significant as the proposed studies are part of exciting and important interdisciplinary work led by College of Nursing faculty who are early stage investigators, which means that they are receiving their first R01 or equivalent research grant. The future looks bright for nursing and transdisciplinary science in our college,” stated Mary Beth Happ, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, associate dean for research and innovation inThe Ohio State University College of Nursing.

NIH funds College of Nursing research

The National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research (NIH/NINR) awarded a $191 K grant to Tondi Harrison, PhD, RN,FAAN, (PI) to fund an administrative supplement to the study, “Behavioral and physiological responses to oral feeding in infants with complex congenital heart disease.” The supplement, from NIH’s INCLUDE program (INvestigation of Co-occurring conditions across the Lifespan to Understand Down SyndromE), will support the addition of infants who have both Down syndrome and congenital heart disease to the study. Harrison is an associate professor in the College of Nursing.

The NIH/NINR also awarded a $423 K, three-year career development grant to Shannon Gillespie, PhD, RN, assistant professor, Martha S. Pitzer Center for Women, Children & Youth. Her study, “Maternal Immune Responsiveness as Clinical Target for Preterm Birth Prevention” (The MIRACL Study) will test a novel method of identifying women at risk for inflammatory preterm birth and determining whether specific preventive interventions are likely to offer benefit during the pregnancy.

Recent grants from the NIH also include a $3.3 million NIH/NIA R01 to Todd Monroe, PhD, RN-BC, FNAP, FGSA, FAAN, (PI); a $2.8 million NIH/NIA R01 to Jodi McDaniel, PhD, RN, (PI) and colleagues, and a $1.8 million NIH/NINR R01 to Carmen Giurgescu, PhD, RN, WHNP, and colleagues at Wayne State University.

“All of our new NIH funding provides evidence of the fantastic cutting-edge research being conducted by our nationally renowned faculty and the terrific research infrastructure that is provided by our college so that our faculty can achieve their dreams and produce major positive impact through their work,” stated Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, vice president for health promotion, university chief wellness officer and dean and professor in the College of Nursing.

Other prestigious institutions support College of Nursing research

The American Cancer Society awarded a five-year, $1.7 million grant to Jennifer Kue, PhD, for the Intergenerational Refugee and Immigrant Cancer Screening Project.

The National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners awarded a foundation grant to Assistant Professor Lisa Kinsella Militello, PhD, MPH, RN, CPNP, to fund the study, “A Solution-Focused Approach: What Low-Income Parents with Young Children Need from Stress-Regulation Smartphone Apps.” IT Project Scientist Emre Sezgin, PhD, of Nationwide Children’s Hospital is a co-investigator on the project.

The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation awarded a grant to Pam Lusk, DNP, RN, FAANP, clinical associate professor, for the study, “Integrating Adolescent Substance Abuse Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) throughout Social Work and Nursing Education.”

The Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation awarded grants to  Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, RN, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, (PI) and colleagues and  Laureen Smith, PhD, RN, FAAN, (PI) and colleagues.

September 18, 2018

The National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research (NIH/NINR) has awarded a $1.8 million R01 grant to fund the study titled, “Paternal Role in Adverse Birth Outcomes in Black Families.” The multiple-PI grant was awarded to Carmen Giurgescu, PhD, RN, WHNP, associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing, Cleopatra Caldwell, PhD, of University of Michigan and Dawn Phillips Misra, PhD, at Wayne State University. The study was funded from September, 2018 to June, 2022.

 

 According to the PIs, “the few studies that have explored paternal effects on birth outcomes have generally excluded understanding the dynamic, complex, and often correlated maternal-paternal relationship…studies often have been limited to an examination of paternal age, occupation, or socioeconomic status. The proposed study will assess whether and how fathers may have an impact on successful birth outcomes.”

 

“Black women are more likely to have adverse birth outcomes such as preterm birth and low birthweight infants compared with White women,” said Giurgescu. “Although the literature has identified a number of risk factors for adverse birth outcomes associated with mothers, little attention has been given to understanding the role of fathers on birth outcomes. Our study will consider the role of social determinants of health, specifically disadvantaged neighborhoods and experiences of racial discrimination for expectant fathers, and their influences on expectant parents’ mental health and birth outcomes among Black families. We will also measure maternal and paternal telomere length, a biological indicator of chronic stress, and its relationship to adverse birth outcomes.” 

The study aims to add another dimension to efforts to reduce racial disparities. “This information can serve as the foundation for recommendations aimed at family-centered interventions to reduce adverse birth outcomes," Giurgescu stated.    

September 17, 2018

The National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging (NIH/NIA) has awarded a five-year, $3.3 million R01 grant to fund the study titled, “Sex Differences in Pain Reports and Brain Activation in Older Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease.” The grant was awarded to Todd Monroe, PhD, RN-BC, FNAP, FGSA, FAAN, (PI) associate professor in The Ohio State University College of Nursing.

Monroe’s interdisciplinary team will include faculty from the College of Nursing, the Departments of Neurology and Geriatrics, and the Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging at Ohio State, as well as collaborators from Vanderbilt University.

“Older adults with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are at risk of having their pain undertreated. We do know that healthy males and females experience pain differently. It is not known if these sex-differences extend into the AD population. This study will provide research focused on better management of pain in people with AD,” Monroe stated in the proposal. “Poorly treated pain in older adults with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a critical public health problem and understanding sex and AD-related differences in pain function is an NIA priority area.”

The proposal stated that when compared to healthy adults, and in the presence of similarly known painful conditions, older adults with AD receive less pain medication. Reasons for this discrepancy are poorly understood. Meanwhile, inadequately treated pain negatively impacts quality of life and increases health care costs.

The research will examine how verbal pain reporting patterns in responses to acute experimental thermal pain differs between older males and females with and without AD and how these sex-differences map onto regional and network brain functional changes. The study aims to determine whether sensory (stimulus intensity) and affective (stimulus unpleasantness) responses differ by sex in people with and without AD during cutaneous thermal stimulation. Examining baseline differences in experimental thermal pain between males and females with and without AD will provide a foundation for understanding factors that may contribute to untreated pain risk, as well as for developing sex-specific novel assessment, prevention, and treatment strategies in the older population with AD.

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