Karen O. Moss

Image
Karen Moss portrait
First Name
Karen O.
Last Name
Moss
Credentials
PhD, RN, CNL
Assistant Professor
she/her/hers
Address
368 Newton Hall
Address (Line 2)
1585 Neil Avenue
City
Columbus
State
OH
Zip Code
43210
 
Research Interest 

Dr. Karen Moss’ program of research focuses on the neuroscience of pain, advance care planning, healthcare decision-making, and quality-of-life outcomes for patients living with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias and other serious chronic illness and their families. She examines factors that influence pain and end-of-life decision-making processes for African American older adults living with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias and their family caregivers. Dr. Moss also seeks to better understand family caregiver stress. She is the principal investigator in the Family Caregiver Community Research (FamCare) Lab and member of the Monroe Lab. Dr. Moss is also an Assistant Professor and mixed methods core faculty member in the Center for Health Outcomes in Medicine, Scholarship and Service (HOMES) in the Department of Internal Medicine in the College of Medicine.

View publications

 

 

Media Reports:
  • Moss, K. O. Advance Planning for the Inevitable. Episode 39. Shifting Perspectives with Yolande Robinson. E. Spotify. yolanderobinson.com/podcast
Publications
Funded Research Grants
Honors
Professional Activities
Professional Society Memberships

News

November 28, 2022

Chief Wellness Officer and College of Nursing Dean will ascend to chair for 2023-2024 term

The National Forum for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention has elected Bernadette Melnyk, PhD, APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, as its new vice-chair of the Board of Directors for the 2022-2023 term.

November 09, 2022

Why more understanding – and a more comprehensive response – are so badly needed

by Jin Jun, PhD, RN

Burnout — a psychological condition involving a prolonged response to enduring interpersonal stressors — has almost become a descriptor for nursing work in recent years. The COVID-19 pandemic has pushed many already-stressed nurses into a deep state of burnout, as evidenced by research that finds one in two nurses reporting symptoms of burnout.1

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